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Conference Workshops

Sponsored by PetSafe

 

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: K9 Nose Work for the Shelter & Special Needs Dog - SOLD OUT!

Jill Marie O'Brien, CPDT-KA, CNWI

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

This workshop is designed to address the unique needs of implementing a K9 NoseWork program in the shelter environment, rescue group or for special needs dogs. The focus will be on the basic concepts and foundation skills for dogs and handlers as part of a shelter/rescue enrichment program. Live demonstrations with shelter/foster dogs and video will be used. For trainers with clients with dogs that have been unsuccessful in other classes or activities, this is an easy to implement activity for any companion dog and owner. We will cover the application and foundation of K9 Nose Work and its practical use in the shelter environment, as well as the basics for getting a program started in a facility. Scenting is a natural and often under-utilized activity for dogs; K9 Nose Work offers dogs both a mental and physical outlet for the stress that can often build from confinement.

Jill Marie O’Brien, CCPDT-KA, has been working with, training and advocating for dogs since 1986; fourteen of those years were spent as Director of Behavior and Training Services for the SPCA-LA. During her tenure with SPCA-LA, she supervised the creation and ongoing development of that agency's first Animal Behavior and Training Department since its inception in 1877. She has worked on a number of projects including the Kal-Kan Bite Prevention and Feral Dog Safety program; Teaching Love and Compassion (TLC), a program that matches at-risk youth with shelter dogs to help build conflict resolution, develop appropriate anger management control skills for youth participants and enhance the dog's adoptability and many additional programs. Jill Marie is also the co-founder of the National Association of K9 Scent Work program.

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: Canine Fitness Foundation Fun - SOLD OUT!

Lisa Blanchard, B.A., LVT, CMT, CCRP

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

This workshop offers insight into using the latest developments in canine-specific equipment and the training techniques needed to create fun, effective and safe exercises for dogs. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of form and technique and how to recognize the signs of fatigue. Trainers will have the chance to utilize various training methods (luring, shaping, capturing, and targeting) in a hands-on approach to work with dogs on equipment.

Lisa began formally training dogs in 1991. Since that time, she has been actively competing in multiple venues. With her dogs, she has achieved titles in conformation, agility, rally, obedience, lure coursing and scent work. Her competition background has been a complement to working with athletes. Lisa started her formal journey into the world of canine physical rehabilitation because she felt that her own competition dogs were in need of bodywork. She became certified in canine massage therapy in 2004 which sparked a desire to learn more, so she changed careers, became a Licensed Veterinary Technician and a Certified Rehabilitation Practitioner (CCRP) through the University of Tennessee's Canine Rehabilitation Program. For eight years, Lisa worked exclusively in the field of rehabilitation. In her years of veterinary practice, Lisa has had the pleasure of working to aid with the rehabilitation of family pets, rescue animals, service dogs, show dogs and canine athletes. As a fellow competitor, she understands canine sports and their rigorous requirements. Through her own business, K9 Fitness Coach, LLC, she develops customized fitness plans, seminars and classes focusing on the importance of fitness, balance and core strength for the canine athlete. Her classes and seminars aim to teach the significance of injury prevention and stress the importance of foundation exercises and behavioral cues. In a quest to expand her knowledge-base, Lisa discovered the Certified Canine Fitness Trainer (CCFT) program. She was intrigued by how the program blended physical and mental fitness together to offer a "total" challenge to the dog. Lisa Completed the CCFT program in 2016. She has since been added to the team of FitPAWS CCFT Instructors and has joined FitPAWS full time as their Education Program Consultant. Lisa lives in Michigan with her two Dobermans (Rylan an Dante) and her husband of 27 years, Tom.

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: Dog Agility: Over, Under, Through

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

Agility is the most popular dog sport in the world --- and also one of the most fun things you can do with your dog. Agility classes usually fill quickly and students attend for a wide variety of reasons. Well-structured agility classes can build confidence in shy dogs, channel excess energy in young dogs, keep older dogs active, and forge the bond between dog and handler. At the Richmond SPCA, we teach over 32 agility classes a week and have multiple students who have had the same dog in classes for over 10 years. About 2/3 of our advanced students get hooked on some level of competition and the other 1/3 simply see it as a great opportunity to spend quality time with their dog.

In this daylong workshop, we will look at a variety of topics related to teaching agility, including ideal class structure, building a solid curriculum, teaching so students “hear” you, student retention, dealing with tricky students/dogs, and general problem-solving. We will also look at topics related to running agility, including the big five reasons things don’t work the way you think they should, either in class or at trials. If you or your students are having any trouble at all, the answer is probably here. We will also address how to include agility as part of a shelter dog enrichment program --- and participants will get to help a few lucky pups get started on their agility careers.

Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

4:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Registration Open


7:00 am - 7:00 pm

Registration Open


8:30 am - 9:15 am

Conference Orientation


9:15 am - 9:30 am

Break


9:30 am - 10:00 am

Welcome


10:00 am - 11:00 am

KEYNOTE: Partner Up: Approaches to Working Hand-in Hand with Your Shelter

Mark Peralta Marc details different specific needs that shelters have for behavioral experts and different ways trainers and behavioral experts are needed to keep animals healthy and getting adopted in shelters. Also, he will explain how behavioral experts can help animals from entering or returning to shelters.
Marc Peralta is the executive director for Best Friend Animal Society - Los Angeles. In 2011, Los Angeles was struggling to save just over half of the cats and dogs entering our city shelters, and under Marc's leadership, LA is on target to meet a 90% save rate by the end of 2017. Marc’s duties as executive director specifically include the operations for the Best Friend’s Pet Adoption Center in Mission Hills, Calif., the NKLA Pet Adoption Center in West Los Angles as well as leading the 119 group and growing NKLA coalition. Marc also served as vice president and chief operating officer as well as interim CEO at the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PSPCA) located in Philadelphia, Penn. In addition to his duties at the Pennsylvania SPCA, Marc also served as a member of the board of directors for the Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia. Prior to the PSPCA, Marc worked in animal care managerial roles at the Nevada Humane Society in Reno, Nev., and the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region in Colorado Springs, Colo.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Everyday Tech: Managing Your Digital Life

Bill Dotson Get ready to take your understanding of everyday technology to the next level. Join Bill as he explains in easy to understand terms how to use the apps, websites and tools people use to make their day more efficient while staying safe. You'll learn about apps, websites, and services to help you with: - scheduling, marketing, and research - finding out if you have a good password - how to manage the 9,999 passwords you have - how to protect your home laptop and mobile phone - how to determine if you've been involved in a hack Somehow, Bill does all of this without using any acronyms or tech jargon. You may even get a tour of the dark web...
Bill Dotson is a speaker, technology consultant, and entrepreneur who has over 20 years of experience helping others understand and use the Internet to reach their goals. Bill speaks to thousands of people each year about the best technology to use to solve problems and achieve their goals. He is a father of three, a Lexington Ky., native, and believes in lifelong learning for everyone.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Poster Session: Lending a Helping Paw: Empathy Towards Owners in Therapy and Non-Therapy Dogs

Julia E. Meyers-Manor Dogs are a unique species in terms of their relation to humans because they are capable of reading human emotional expressions as a result of domestication, and so dogs may show empathy not only toward fellow dogs but also toward humans. Dogs have been found to empathetically respond to humans’ emotional states, as they attend more to crying people than humming people (Custance & Mayer, 2012). However, whether dogs can actively provide help to humans in need, and whether they provide help based on empathetic evaluations of humans’ emotional states, is unclear. This study used a trapped-other paradigm, modified from use in research on rats, to study prosocial helping in dogs. A human trapped behind a door either cried or hummed, and the dog’s behavior and physiological responses, including whether they opened the door and their heart rate, was recorded. The study also tested whether certified therapy dogs showed more empathy or prosocial helping behaviors than non-therapy dogs. Dogs in the distress condition opened slightly less frequently, but significantly more quickly, than dogs in the neutral condition. There was no difference in opening behavior between therapy and non-therapy dogs, although there were some modest differences based on the type of therapy dog certification. During an impossible task, dogs who opened more quickly in the prosocial task gazed longer at their owners, which supports that prosocial helping may be associated with stronger owner bond. This indicates that dogs may be capable of empathetically evaluating humans’ emotional states and modifying their behavior accordingly.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Poster Session: Positive Punishment and Reinforcement Trends and its Association With Problem Behaviors in Pet Dogs

Alexandre Rossi Recent research indicates that there is a positive correlation between positive punishment and problem behaviors in domestic canines. Although this correlation does not necessarily indicate causation, further studies might lead to a better understanding of how dog-owner relationships and techniques applied might contribute to define behavioral trends or characteristics. The purpose of this study is to identify which specific aspects of the administration of positive punishment might be responsible for this positive correlation. Furthermore, we sought to identify the trends of dog owners, how they relate to their dog, and how positive reinforcement and positive punishment choices correlate with their dog's behavior. We used an online questionnaire to gather information from over 54,000 dog owners in Brazil, which has the second largest pet dog population in the world. The questionnaire contained 16 questions and focused on gathering information relating to the dog owner's preferred methods of positive reinforcement and positive punishment, their timing in administering reinforcement or punishment after the behavior occurs, and information relating to the relationship the pet owner had with their dog. Over half (55%) of participants stated that their canine sleeps in the bedroom and 58% stated that they always reward their dog for desired behaviors with 91% stating they reward with praise and touch. Nearly half of the participants stated that they always punish their dog for house soiling (47%), excessive barking (40%), and destruction of household objects (51%). Further research can look deeper into analyzing and understanding these dog owner trends and help dog trainers and behavior consultants have a better understanding of how dog owners' behaviors might affect their dog's behavior. This knowledge can open up new effective strategies to change the behavior of dog owners to increase positive behavior in their canines.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Poster Session: Feasibility of Using Trained Dogs to Alert to Gluten in Food for People with Celiac Disease

Debbie Kay Introduction
The use of dogs to assist people with medical conditions is not a new idea; there is some anecdotal evidence of dogs trained for gluten detection. There is no documentation however to show the reliability or sensitivity of the dog’s trained to alert to gluten. Additionally, there are no published protocols to establish the dogs understanding of the different types of gluten in its many forms.

Method
A pilot dog was chosen from an established bloodline of purebred Labrador Retriever detection dogs and was trained using the Super Sniffer® Program. The pilot dog was started on the training program at 8 weeks of age and was in continuous training during her growth and development over a one-year period. All testing was double blind testing using a scent wheel to avoid any handler induced reactions.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Brand YOU: Maximize Your Personal Brand

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA Whether you are a small business owner or a member of a big team, your personal brand contributes to the success of any organization with which you are affiliated. Your brand may be the difference between you and a competitor. Don't be overwhelmed! Attend this session to find out more about steps to branding, managing your online presence and tools to really make you shine!
Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, is the executive director of Accounting and Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA. Born with an entreprenurial drive and passion for service, Ericka has more than 15 years of professional experience in the nonprofit and business sectors. A business owner since sixth grade, she quickly grew her career in fundraising, grants, and nonprofit management. Ericka is responsible for raising $14 million in funds, serves as a federal grant review chair, provides consulting services to nonprofits, co-founded a social enterprise catering company, and teaches communication and fundraising at the university level. To gain a broad foundation to build on, she pursued higher education in marketing and communication, earning a masters and bachelors in communication, a bachelor's in marketing and is a doctoral candidate in organizational leadership concentrating on nonprofit leadership from Eastern University in St. David's, Penn. She currently serves on the board of directors for Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, Professional Women's Forum and God's Closet, Inc.

12:15 pm - 1:15 pm

Break - Lunch Concessions Available for Purchase


1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Humane Education for Children

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA The Richmond SPCA offers over 20,000 hours of humane education each year via tours/visits/birthday parties/summer camp and have plenty of kids on dog-training classes. We have certainly learned a lot about engaging this next generation of dog owners, inspiring compassion for animals in general, teaching the basics of reward-based training (kid timing is often far superior to adult timing) and promoting safety when meeting/greeting dogs. These are topics that ought to be taught repeatedly in every single community.
Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

A Dog's View of the World

Tim Lewis, Ph.D. Most dog enthusiasts know that canines must see the world differently from people, but lack more specifics. Because humans rely so heavily on vision, we tend to impose that lens on dogs. However, canine vision differs from humans, and their reliance on vision is less than ours. In this overview presentation, we will look at the biology of dog vision as well as hearing and smell. These senses really take place in the brain, so we will also explore what is known about canine brains and cognition. Each part will include links back to wolf biology and the context in which these senses developed over time, and the impacts these differences from us have on how a dog views our world.
Tim Lewis, Ph.D., is an eco-biologist, professor of biology at the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul Minn., and a widely-published research scientist. In addition, he is a popular lecturer on Canine Cognition at Camp Gone to the Dogs, VT and other venues nationwide. Tim has a longtime connection to the fields of human physiology and health, as well as the very different pedagogies involved in teaching activities courses such as the National Association of Underwater Instructors. He worked closely with Health and Human Performance (HHP) in the development of biology’s link to public health and provided stewardship to the HHP Department during its 2015 decennial review.

1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

The Real Deal: Arousal, Relaxation, Attention and Self-Modulation

Suzanne Clothier Handlers struggle with their dog’s unproductive arousal, lack of self-control, and lack of focus. Sometimes, the struggle is very physical as the handler tries to hang on to the dog using halters, harnesses and other devices. Relaxation is attempted at best in quiet moments here or there in “distraction free” areas, or through exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting for the client) protocols. A multitude of techniques and equipment exists to help handlers physically control their dogs, and to help dogs calm down, focus, relax. But frustrated handlers can feel that they are drowning in a plethora of options that may or may not be effective, even when they are diligent about doing the work. Worse still, they may have a dog who has many trained behaviors but is still challenging when not under specific cue or being kept on task, and who may still need special equipment. In part, the current dog training emphasis is on applied techniques which are sometimes applied without the necessary foundation that allows for learning and successful application. This presentation uses lecture, video and interactive exercises to present simple, effective techniques for helping handlers and dogs build the correct foundation for learning: • productive arousal (Think & Learn Zone) • relaxation (Really Real Relaxation) • self modulation (Auto Check-In, and Say Hi 1-2-3). These techniques are well grounded in behavioral, social and cognitive science, but are simple to learn and apply, even for the novice dog handler. Simple never equals simplistic. Simple choices are often at the heart of complex systems and profound results. Knowing how to help handler make simple choices can empower them to achieve the results they want in their relationship with their dogs. For the professional, this presentation emphasizes: • Authentic behavior vs. “faux” behavior o how is the authentic behavior expressed? o what are key elements of that behavior? o how to recognize artifacts or “noise” o creating the necessary conditions for the authentic behavior to occur • The power of intrinsic motivation & reinforcement o why intrinsic trumps extrinsic o rapid acquisition & strength of intrinsically driven behaviors o aligned vs. misaligned behaviors o creating intrinsic motivation • The value of social interaction, modeling and honest signaling o social interaction as the fabric of relationship o congruent communication o distinguishing a dog activity from a mutual activity • How simple yes/no decision points = complex achievements o “How is this for you?” o The Goldilocks Effect • Strengthening & improving the dog/human relationship in positive, humane ways Think & Learn Zone™ Does this advice sound familiar? “Begin in a quiet, distraction free environment.” While it sounds good on paper, in practice, this common advice turns out to have several drawbacks: 1. A quiet, distraction free environment has nothing to do with the dog’s own state of arousal. 2. Handlers are not taught to recognize, assess their dog’s arousal, and make appropriate yes/no decisions. 3. It sends a message to handlers that their dogs are not capable of learning when there is less than an ideal setting. 4. Both handler and dog can develop skills that are applicable only under ideal conditions. (“He does it at home in the kitchen!”) 5. Handlers are not empowered to make intelligent decisions about training vs. management in the real world. A different approach focuses on what the dog can tell us about his level of arousal and thus his ability to think and learn in any given moment. If the dog can think and learn in that setting, then it is an environment where training is possible, no matter how many distractions are present.
Suzanne Clothier has been working with animals professionally since 1977, she has a deep background of experience that includes obedience, agility, puppy testing, breeding, search and rescue, conformation, instructing, kennel management and canine midwifery. She has taught across the US and internationally for groups as varied as Wolf Park, FEMA-Northeast Region Disaster Dog Teams, Alaskan Dog Musher Association, and Assistance Dogs International. She has taught for training groups, rescues and shelters, veterinarians, breeders, national conferences, and search and rescue organizations. She served as a committee member for AKC Agility Advisory Board, American Humane Association Task Force for the Development of Humane Standards in Dog Training. She has served as a consultant to Guiding Eyes for the Blind, Southeastern Guide Dogs, Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation, Assistance Dogs of the West, and Guide Dogs of America. A German Shepherd breeder, eight generations of her Hawks Hunt German Shepherds have been successful in obedience, agility, SAR, tracking, nosework, herding, therapy work and as guide dog breeding stock. She lives on a working farm in upstate New York with husband, John Rice, and their considerable animal family of dogs, cats, parrots, tortoises, Scottish Highland cattle, horses, donkeys, pigs and chickens.

1:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Broadening Horizons: New Roles for Canine Professionals in Animal Assisted Interventions

Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC Interest in Animal Assisted Interventions (AAI) in many sectors has exploded in recent years, and dog trainers have increasingly offered therapy dog training classes for those interested in preparing their dogs for this type of work. Not all AAI programs have the same requirements for dogs, however, and expansions in the ways that dogs are included in therapy and visitation work mean new roles for canine professionals. This session highlights current trends in the broad field of AAI and the many needs of dog owners who wish to become involved. Traditional AAI programs are contrasted with innovative programs that require different personalities and different preparation of dogs. New roles for dog trainers to help meet the varied demands of this trend are covered, along with tips for working closely with therapists as they develop relationships and prepare their dogs for myriad roles. Drawing on her in-depth experience in training therapists and building AAI programs, Dr. VanFleet will discuss assessment tools, selection processes, training geared toward different roles, consultations with therapists about suitability of dogs or problems that crop up, teaching about canine communication signals, ethical and animal welfare considerations, and what dog trainers need to know about the different types of AAI now available. Forward-looking dog trainers will learn ways to offer new services and training options to clients who themselves are pushing the envelope in AAI.
(Limited seats available). Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC, is a licensed psychologist, registered play therapist-supervisor, and certified dog behavior consultant who directs both the Playful Pooch Program and the Family Enhancement & Play Therapy Center in Boiling Springs, Penn. She is also the founder of the International Institute for Animal Assisted Play Therapy™. She has over 40 years of experience working with children, parents, families, and groups in a variety of mental health and educational settings. Her work developing the field of Animal Assisted Play Therapy™ brought her more fully into the dog training/consultation world over 15 years ago, and she teaches mental health professionals about canine ethology, development, communication, and behavior/training for their AAPT work. She volunteers her training/behavior services at a local rescue, and provides in-home dog behavior consultations. She has a special interest in highly fearful, unsocialized, and traumatized dogs, and has pioneered the systematic use of play as part of their rehabilitation. She is the author of dozens of professional books, chapters, and articles about child/family therapy, play therapy, and dog training, the award-winning book Play Therapy with Kids & Canines, and the acclaimed Human Half of Dog Training: Collaborating with Clients to Get Results. She has received 12 national awards for her contributions to the field of psychology and her writing. Her latest book, Animal Assisted Play Therapy, will be published in 2017. Known for her warm, down-to-earth, lighthearted, and practical style, her past presentations at APDT and other conferences have been extremely well received. She is kept humble by her four dogs and three cats.

3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Observations on the Socialization of Dogs

Sue Sternberg The current dog world promotes and supports a vague notion of 'Socialization' that encourages dog owners to have their dogs meet many strangers during their puppyhood and to play with other puppies in order to grow up friendly with other dogs. There are few specific details on how to do this, and even fewer adjustments for differing temperaments--from fearful to bold, sociable and non-sociable. What does playing with other puppies teach our puppies? Are some of the socializing techniques we promote outdated for the modern world--a world in which there are more dogs, more multiple dog households, more play between dogs and seemingly less between owner and dog, less access to nature, and what's seems to be a growing number of problematic temperaments? What do we do if we get our dogs at the age of five months (past the apparent critical socialization period)? Or at a year? Are there still training and socialization techniques that might help dogs? By showing video footage of some of the current practices I will show behaviors and offer observations of what I believe can be fallout from current practices, or owner-interpretation of vague recommendations. I will also show video footage of ways to escort dogs through the universe and 'socialize' them in such a way as to thwart the trend of owners letting their leashed and unleashed dogs descend upon any dog they encounter. I wish to challenge some of the current socialization recommendations and offer ways of encouraging new puppy owners and new owners of dogs of all ages to raise dogs that find their owners most important and fun, are confident enough to navigate society, feel safe in their environments, find a purpose/work, and are hopefully able to cope with whatever the world throws at them.
Sue Sternberg has over 35 years of dog behavior experience, including as a dog control officer, kennel and animal care technician at various shelters, dog trainer, behavior counselor, instructor, temperament evaluator, boarding kennel owner, veterinary assistant, is a successful competitor in a variety of dog sports, and a teacher of dog trainers. In 1993 she started her own shelter in upstate New York and has created national shelter programs to improve the lives of shelter dogs. Sue has two main goals in life: to make the shelter dog world a better place and to make public dog parks safer and more fun for dogs who must use them. To do this, Sue travels and educates people on canine communication, body language and behavior. She is the author of Successful Dog Adoption (Howell Book House) and numerous other books--most recently How Old is This Dog? They can all be found at Dogwise.com. Sue has produced many DVDs on dog behavior and aggression, and also has an iPhone app, The Dog Park Assistant, which is a video repository of dog play and aggressive behaviors, to ensure that when dogs get together they are truly having fun and not going to hurt each other. Sue has two wonderful, adopted heeler mixes. Sue is also an accomplished fiddle player, an amateur paleontologist, loves Earl Grey tea, and is a major Star Trek fan.

3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Fear Free Veterinary Care - What Dog Trainers Need to Know

Ellen Lindell, VMD, DACVB What is the Fear Free℠initiative? There was a time when pet professionals focused more on the destination than the journey. We had an end point in mind and worked efficiently to accomplish that end point, without much regard to the emotional well-being of the pet or the pet’s person. The Fear Free℠ initiative began as veterinary health care teams recognized that many pets and clients alike experienced distress when they visited the animal hospital. While dogs drag their owners into the pet food store hoping for treats and toys, these very same dogs only enter the veterinary hospital if they are coaxed and cajoled. In the examination room, many pets used to struggle while teams of assistants tried to hold them down. It could be difficult to get an accurate assessment of temperature or heart rate in these distressed animals. The Fear Free℠initiative offers a fresh new way of delivering veterinary care. With the help of an Advisory Panel of many animal experts, guidelines have been created to facilitate a calm veterinary experience. These guidelines consider ways to manage the physical environment as well as the social environment. Fear Free℠ concepts can be applied to the stress associated with all aspects of a veterinary visit. From the car ride to the waiting area. From the exam room to the hospital ward. And even after a patient returns home, he may experience stress associated with special care or exercise restrictions needed during the recovery period. With a little guidance, we can change our behavior and use a quiet approach. We’ll discuss behavior modification to give their patients the skills to relax and accept handling, veterinarians and pet owners need the help of behaviorists and trainers. During our session, we will discuss some of the important skills needed for a general examination as well as for management of some common illnesses or procedures. We will talk about ways to develop a customized DSCC protocol that meets the need of an individual. Network with veterinary health care teams – they may not know that you are available to help. Integrating the behavioral needs of pets with their medical needs is a win-win approach. Let’s discuss some opportunities in your area!
Dr. Lindell attended and graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Penn. She then received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. After practicing general medicine and surgery for several years, Dr. Lindell began a residency program in veterinary behavior at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. She successfully fulfilled the requirements for board-certification and is now a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. Dr. Lindell is an active member and President-Elect of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. She is also an active Board member of the Westchester Rockland Veterinary Medical Association. Though most of her time is spent practicing behavioral medicine, Dr. Lindell loves to teach. She serves as a behavior consultant on VIN (Veterinary Information Network) and frequently lectures to veterinarians at both regional and national conferences. Dr. Lindell has been an invited speaker at meetings of paraprofessionals, breeders, and pet owners. In between practicing and lecturing, Dr. Lindell enjoys writing about behavior. For many years, she wrote a popular Q & A column in the Cornell University publication, Catwatch. She has written chapters for several veterinary textbooks as well as public interest books. When there is time to spare, Dr. Lindell and her dogs participate in dog related sports including agility and obedience. Her non-pet passion: classical piano.

5:15 pm - 5:30 pm

Business Meeting


5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Exhibit Hall Open - Ziwi Welcome Reception



Ziwi Welcome Reception and Exhibit Hall Grand Opening (TAILgate Theme)



Bring your favorite team jersey, tshirt or attire as we kickoff the Grand Opening of the exhibit hall. Hors d’ouevres and cash bar. Ziwi is a small team whose love for their pets is pure and simple, just like their recipes. They put the best of New Zealand into their farm-to-bowl pet products so you and your pet can share a lifetime of adventures together.www.ziwipets.com.
Ziwi Welcome Reception and Exhibit Hall Grand Opening (TAILgate Theme) Bring your favorite team jersey, tshirt or attire as we kickoff the Grand Opening of the exhibit hall. Hors d’ouevres and cash bar. Ziwi is a small team whose love for their pets is pure and simple, just like their recipes. They put the best of New Zealand into their farm-to-bowl pet products so you and your pet can share a lifetime of adventures together.www.ziwipets.com.

7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Registration Open


8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - The Magic of Games for Your Dog

Sally Montrucchio, CPDT-KA The Magic of Games is for the beginner to the advanced trainer. Games that will be introduced are perfect for puppies to the advanced doggie student.
The trainers will be introduced to games that will engage their clients and dogs in the art of learning from positions, retrieval, problem solving and independent thinking while having fun at the same time!
Shorten the dog’s learning curve by using your imagination and items that are already in the training room or at home.
Trainers will learn that by mixing games into their training sessions, clients will be eager for more.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - Dogs Trust

Rachel Casey, DVM, Director of Dogs Canine Behavior and Research Dogs Trust is active in ten countries worldwide and we are looking to bring this non-profit initiative (Dog School) to the USA. We would like to take this time to present the concept of Dog School and make APDT members aware of the opportunities that this may bring for them and their colleagues and how we would like to work with them in the U.S.
Within this presentation we would like to include a session on 'how puppies learn' based on the extensive research Dr. Casey has led in the UK and why we teach our Life Skills classes to puppy owners accordingly, in order to prevent problem behaviors.
Dr. Rachel Casey is a veterinary surgeon, animal behaviorist and welfare scientist, now working jointly at Dogs Trust and the Royal Veterinary College in the UK, having previously worked at the University of Bristol. Rachel has a Ph.D. in animal behavior and lead a research group investigating aspects of companion animal behavior and welfare. She is also a clinician, helping owners with animals that show behavior problems. Her clinical qualifications include being a Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Recognized Specialist in Veterinary Behavioral Medicine, and a European Diplomat in both Veterinary Behavior and Animal Welfare specialties. Dr. Casey lectures internationally about the behavior of dogs, cats and horses to a range of audiences, and is a regular contributor to various media, most recently on BBC 2’s "The Wonder of Dogs" and Channel 4's "Dogs: Their Secret Lives." She also promotes high welfare standards for companion animals through organizations like the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific committee, and was a founding council member of the Animal Behavior and Training Council (ABTC.)

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - What Is Your Dog's Currency?

Shannon Coyner, B.A., CPDT-KA, KPA, CTP Trainers commonly use treats as a reinforcement for training and will sometimes use toys and play. Often when we choose what we use to reinforce our learners, we use what we would like. Understanding all the reinforcements you have available can help you train even when toys and treats are not available. This presentation will help you think outside of the box when training your dog (cat, bird, horse, parrot or other animal) which will give you more options for training.
Shannon has been a pet lover all her life and a dog trainer for over 20 years. She has spent her life observing, caring for and training animals of all kinds. She has worked in the Bird Department at Marine World Africa USA, and worked as an handler and trainer for an African Serval Cat at Safari West, a private zoo in Santa Rosa, California. She has participated in behavior studies including observations of bald eagles and addax antelope through the San Francisco Zoo and Safari West.
Her education includes a Biology Degree, specializing in Zoology from Sonoma State. She is a Registered Veterinary Technician, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (Knowledge Assessed), a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner, a member of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers and a member of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants.
Shannon is currently serving as president for the Society of Veterinary Behavior Technicians. Shannon's dog training philosophy revolves around force free, positive reinforcement, however, her ultimate goal is for healthy happy relationship between pets and their people. Diet, exercise, environment and training all play a significant role in achieving this goal. Shannon is currently the owner of Ventura Pet Wellness and Dog Training Center in Ventura, Calif., where she works with anxious and fearful dogs privately as well as teaching agility classes (Venturapetwellness.com). Shannon has also started a training website called Truly Force Free Animal Training (trulyforcefree.com).

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Poster Session: A Change of Heart: Examining Heart Rate Variability in the Treatment of Aggression

Kate Anders, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA Aggression is one of the leading causes of dog surrender and euthanasia. Inter-dog aggression poses a threat to other animals and leaves owners exhausted and dogs unable to cope while outside of their homes. Understanding and treating aggression in dogs is of interest to shelters, trainers, and dog owners alike. One physiological measure that might serve as an index of aggression is heart rate variability (HRV), which refers to the vagally mediated beat-to-beat change in heart rate. Low HRV has been associated with impaired emotional and behavioral regulation and stress in both humans and animals. Research suggested that HRV is significantly lower in dogs with a bite history compared to dogs without a bite history (Craig et al., 2017). A case study of treatment of aggression has also indicated that HRV changes along with behavioral changes (Williams et al., 2003). In the present study, we examined dogs taking group training classes for aggression and dogs in basic obedience to measure HRV across the course. Dogs had their HRV recorded and were video taped during an in-home baseline session, during the first class, the third class, and the sixth (final class), followed by a final in-home session. All dogs, regardless of reactivity status, showed similar HRV in their homes. This suggests that dogs who are dog reactive may have better emotional regulation, at least in the presence of strangers, than dogs who show more human reactivity. All dogs also showed large decreases in HRV during the first training class. This suggests that the novel training environment is stressful for all dogs, but most dogs show strong recovery by the final week of class. Comparisons to video coding of the classes suggest that stressful experiences can be seen through the dog’s individual HRV data. This data could provide useful information for individuals attempting to minimize stress responses in training classes.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Poster Session: Behavioral and Epigenetic Variations in Differentially Socialized Dog Puppies

Katherine Grillaert Socialization during the sensitive period of puppy development, and even extending through adolescence, is considered a major contributor to adult dog temperament and behavior toward humans. However, there is little empirical research following cohorts from puppyhood to adult, given different rearing environments. This study follows two litters of puppies born at the Wolf Science Center, Austria. The puppies were reared with their littermates and mothers, and received structured socialization with humans and their private dogs. At eight weeks of age, 6 puppies were adopted as pets, and lived in an urban environment, in family homes. The remaining 8 puppies continued to live in the captive dog packs, in enclosures in a wildlife park, receiving daily training and socialization with humans.
All puppies participated in a battery of behavioral tests for exploratory behavior, neophobia, and sociability between the ages of 6-8 weeks, and again at age 2.5 years. These tests may demonstrate variation in behavioral development as influenced by their early and ongoing relationships with humans.
A hormonal mediator of these behaviors of interest, as well as of the human-dog and dog-dog relationships, may be oxytocin, which has been shown to promote affiliative behaviors in both species, and is also thought to play a role in fearful and exploratory behaviors. Genetic polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) are mediators of sociocognitive traits, and there is increasing evidence that epigenetic variation, particularly DNA cytosine methylation, also plays a role. These epigenetic marks regulate gene expression, and are sensitive to environmental factors yet can be stably maintained during cell division. In the case of OXTR, methylation levels have been shown to be sensitive to maternal care (both in rodents and humans) and have also been correlated with stress responses and fear behaviors (in rodents, dogs and humans).
In this study, in order to examine a biological mechanism possibly linking environmental effects and development, we collected buccal DNA samples weekly until puppies were 24 weeks of age. We furthermore collected buccal samples for eight consecutive weeks at the age of 2.5 years, corresponding in time with the administration of the behavioral tests. OXTR methylation was assessed at 4 promoter cytosines previously shown to be variably methylated and to be related to canine social reactions. We will discuss how OXTR methylation and behavioral tests may provide insight on canine socio-behavioral development given differing rearing and social environments.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

It's Time to Train the Trainer About Fear FreeTM

Marty Becker, DVM Chances are you’ve loved pets from the time you were very young. Chances are your parents probably have stories of you trying to “fix up” the family pets and train them to have better manners. The last thing you would ever do is to knowingly make life worse for pets. But chances also are you’re harming pets more often than you know or would like to believe.
You’ve adopted positive-based methods to train pets, but may not have realized that you also have a key part to play in looking after both the physical and emotional well-being of pets. How would you like to take your career to a new level of impact, where pets live happier, healthier, fuller lives, pet owners look at you as a pet health expert, and where you achieve the financial success and emotional wealth you never dared to dream possible?
It’s not a dream; it’s here today in the form of a transformative initiative called Fear Free, where the goal is to “take the pet out of petrified.”
The veterinary profession wants to work with trainers like you to reduce fear, anxiety, and stress (FAS) in pets’ lives, increase enrichment activities, and help pets live, happy, healthy, full lives. Embrace Fear Free and you’ll “do well, by doing good.”
Dr. Marty Becker, “America’s Veterinarian,” has spent his life working toward better health for pets and the people who love them. In recent years, “taking the ‘pet’ out of ‘petrified’” and ensuring every pet and pet owner can experience a Fear FreeTM veterinary visit has been his area of greatest commitment and dedication, culminating in the launch of Fear Free certification for veterinarians in March of 2016. Dr. Becker was the resident veterinary contributor on "Good Morning America" for 17 years. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the American Humane Association as well as its Chief Veterinary Correspondent, a founding member of Core Team Oz for "The Dr. Oz Show," a member of the Dr. Oz Medical Advisory Panel, and a Today contributor. An adjunct professor at the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, and the University of Missouri, he has lectured at every veterinary school in the United States. He also serves on the advisory board of World Vets, an international veterinary and disaster relief programs to help animals. A passionate advocate for the human-animal bond, Dr. Becker is as an adjunct professor at the Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction at the University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine. In April 2012, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association named Dr. Becker the recipient of their annual WSAVA Hill’s Excellence in Veterinary Healthcare Award (also known as the Global Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year). He has also been named Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year by the Delta Society (now Pet Partners) and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Born in Twin Falls, Idaho, in 1954, Dr. Becker practices at North Idaho Animal Hospital because he loves veterinary medicine, pets and the people who care for them.

10:00 am - 2:00 pm

Exhibit Hall Open


11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Break - Lunch Concessions Available for Purchase


11:15 am - 12:00 pm

Round Table Topics

Regional Round Tables:
-North Central
-South Central
-Southeast
-Northeast
-Southwest
-Pacific Coast
-International

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Lights, Camera, Action! Creating Superstars is Your Business

Toni Mark, M.A., KPA-CTP and Michelle Mullins, CPDT-KA, KPA-CTP Working on photo and video shoots can be stressful situations especially for animals and their owners. Michelle and Toni are passionate the animals and their pet parents have an amazing experience on set even if they have little to no experience. After several years and many shoots later, they have learned the tricks of the trade to ensuring the animal remains comfortable and happy so the photographer or videographer can get the perfect shot. Join Michelle and Toni as they address how, as trainers, you can do the same and incorporate your skills as services for local companies, family portraits, wedding services and other outlets.
Goals will be to:
-Understand the trainer’s role in a photo/video shoot and how to work cohesively with the team to maximize the opportunity of getting the shot while being the best advocate for the animal.
-Identify potential career opportunities by including this expertise as an additional service for clients.
-Understand ways to make the animal the most comfortable in a potentially stressful short-term situation.
Michelle Mullins and Toni Mark make up the Training & Behavior Education Department for Radio Systems Corporation PetSafe® brand. Michelle is is a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer and TAGTeach Primary Level Certified. Toni is a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner and has a Masters degree in Communication. She has also completed the Karen Pryor Academy Shelter Training and Enrichment Program One of their responsibilities is to handle animals at the photo and video shoots for the PetSafe brand. This duty requires they have the dog or cat in the correct position for the right shot, but more importantly, ensure that the dog or cat remain comfortable, relaxed and happy during the entire shoot. This process also includes creating a cooperative and comfortable environment between the pet owner, photographer and trainer to ensure the animal is in a non-stressful environment and is handled with the utmost care. After several years and many photo shoots for a large corporation, they have learned the tricks to the trade to take an average pet and make him a superstar!

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Drones, Social Media and More: Using Technology in Your Practice

Bill Dotson Join Bill as he walks you through a day in the life of a training client and a trainer to learn how technology allows both people to have a great experience. He’ll describe the expectations buyers have in 2017 and how you can meet and exceed them using technology tools such as email marketing, social media, video education, automated reviews, and more. This session uses the story of a client and trainer to highlight how technology can touch every part of your business. As the session proceeds, you’ll learn new ways to think about technology, reputable tools to use, what activities you should and should not spend time on, and approximate costs to make it all happen. Bill wraps up the session with marketing ideas empowered by tech tools. Don’t miss this if you want to grow your practice and amaze your clients.
Bill Dotson is a speaker, technology consultant, and entrepreneur who has over 20 years of experience helping others understand and use the Internet to reach their goals. Bill speaks to thousands of people each year about the best technology to use to solve problems and achieve their goals. He is a father of three, a Lexington, Ky., native, and believes in lifelong learning for everyone.

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Furry Funding: Grant and Fundraising Basics

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA Looking for funding does not have to be an overwhelming task for staff and volunteers. But funding is very necessary to achieving your mission. Let’s take some frustrations out of the process and make a solid plan. In this session learn basics of fundraising principles and grant development as well as funding research methods. We will dive in to a variety of funding mechanisms as well as what makes a grant application successful to address your needs.
Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, is the Executive Director of Accounting & Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA. Born with an entreprenurial drive and passion for service, Ericka has over 15 years of professional experience in the nonprofit and business sectors. A business owner since sixth grade, she quickly grew her career in fundraising, grants, and nonprofit management. Ericka is responsible for raising $14 million in funds, service as a federal grant review chair, providing consulting services to nonprofits, co-founding a social enterprise catering company, and teaching communication and fundraising at the university level. To gain a broad foundation to build on, she pursued higher education in marketing and communication, earning a masters and bachelors in Communication, a bachelor's in marketing and is a Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Leadership concentrating on Nonprofit Leadership from Eastern University in St. David's, Penn. She currently serves on the board of directors for Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, Professional Women's Forum and God's Closet, Inc.

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall Open


2:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Break


2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

What Size World is Right for This Dog?

Suzanne Clothier Past the simple notion of thresholds, dogs exist in a complex web of relationships and environment, expectations and abilities. As a species, dogs can find themselves at odds with or pressured by life with humans. As an individual, each dog is unique in his capacity for adapting to life with humans, in sensory processing and sensitivities, and in the nuances of temperament and personality. The individual dog’s abilities, skills and needs are brought together with the expectations, skills, needs and understanding of the handler. Each handler varies in their understanding of dogs as a species, dogs as specific breeds or types, and of each dog as an individual. While love is a good thing, it is not enough to assure that the handler will act in ways that are supportive or fair to the dog. The dog and handler live together within specific conditions which may or may not support the dog or the relationship. This shared life can be a beautiful meshing of abilities and needs, or it can be a frustrating, disappointing and difficult mismatch. One common question that arises from this complex interaction of dog, handler and environment is: “How do I know what is too much, or not enough?” Handlers want to do right by their dog, providing them with a “happy life.” But what constitutes a happy life? What is enough? What is too much? What is not enough? What size world is right for this dog? We are always seeking the Goldilocks Effect: We want it to be just right. But even professionals can struggle to find that “just right” balance for any specific dog. It can be challenging to know what technique or equipment or methodology are right for an individual dog. Trainers are often puzzled by why an approach that is – in theory – appropriate is just not having the desired results, particularly if it has been helpful with other dogs. Are they applying it incorrectly? too soon? too often? not frequently enough? Should they keep working at it for another session or week or month? Training techniques and equipment are effective only under specific conditions. The question is which specific conditions are necessary for success? Very often, the answer hinges completely on the dog himself. Trainers are also frequently faced with the challenge of handlers who have expectations or needs that are not aligned with a dog’s abilities, temperament or skills. For the ethical, humane trainer, the question becomes a tricky one: “How can the dog be protected and supported while still allowing for improvement and development of new skills?” For some dogs, there is a limit past which they simply cannot go, regardless of how positive, humane or well intended the training. Knowing how to recognize that limit is critical. How far can this dog go?” Handlers and trainers both ask this, hoping that there is a crystal ball answer somewhere. None of us have crystal balls, but we can learn to utilize nuanced assessment tools for understanding the individual dog and making informed decisions in the dog’s best interests. This presentation offers trainers a number of ways to ask the dog himself: “What size world is right for you?” It turns out that the dog himself can provide the answers, if we know what to look for, and how to place it in the proper context. Emphasis is on using video, a variety of assessment tools and interactive exercises to help attendees understand what a dog’s behavior can tell us about: • Arousal & resilience o Intensity of arousal and its effects on learning o Importance of resolution • Temperament & personality o “Who are you?” o Personality = temperament + experience o What’s mutable? • Skills & training o What skills does dog have? o What skills need to be developed? o Skills & training vs. abilities • Handler/dog dynamics o Realistic assessment vs. hopes & dreams o Providing context and scale • Monitoring progress o “How is this for you?” o What size world? o Testing the fit The assessment tools I have developed will be demonstrated: • RAT
For some dogs, there is a limit past which they simply cannot go, regardless of how positive, humane or well-intended the training. Knowing how to recognize that limit is critical. How far can this dog go?” Handlers and trainers both ask this, hoping that there is a crystal ball answer somewhere. None of us have crystal balls, but we can learn to utilize nuanced assessment tools for understanding the individual dog and making informed decisions in the dog’s best interests. This presentation offers trainers ways to ask the dog himself: “What size world is right for you?” It turns out that the dog himself can provide the answers, if we know what to look for, and how to place it in the proper context. Emphasis is on using video, a variety of assessment tools and interactive exercises to help attendees understand what a dog’s behavior can tell us about: arousal and resilience - Intensity of arousal and its effects on learning o Importance of resolution; temperament and personality - “Who are you?”- Personality = temperament + experience - What’s mutable?; skills & training - What skills does dog have? - What skills need to be developed? - Skills & training vs. abilities; handler/dog dynamics - Realistic assessment vs. hopes and dreams - Providing context and scale; Monitoring progress - “How is this for you?” - What size world? - Testing the fit.

2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

Empathy, Teaching, & Boundary-Setting: Finding the Right Mix with Human Clients

Risë VanFleet Working with human clients to train their dogs is highly complex work, often because of the human factors involved. Canine professionals need to listen and understand, teach new skills, and manage the interactions so that the dogs benefit. Sometimes trainers find themselves in roles resembling marital therapists, child minders, and divorce court judges. At other times, they are frustrated by lack of follow-through, unrealistic expectations, and wondering if their teaching is having any impact at all. This presentation highlights three key components of the training and consultation process, with an emphasis on the need for balance among them. The session includes ways to keep training on track despite the many things that can go wrong. It also covers ways to set boundaries tactfully and to use understanding of clients' needs to help build better follow-through. The interplay and prioritization of empathy, teaching, and boundaries will be highlighted by challenging case examples and activities.
Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC, is a licensed psychologist, registered play therapist-supervisor, and certified dog behavior consultant who directs both the Playful Pooch Program and the Family Enhancement & Play Therapy Center in Boiling Springs, PA. She is also the founder of the International Institute for Animal Assisted Play Therapy™. She has over 40 years of experience working with children, parents, families, and groups in a variety of mental health and educational settings. Her work developing the field of Animal Assisted Play Therapy™ brought her more fully into the dog training/consultation world over 15 years ago, and she teaches mental health professionals about canine ethology, development, communication, and behavior/training for their AAPT work. She volunteers her training/behavior services at a local rescue, and provides in-home dog behavior consultations. She has a special interest in highly fearful, unsocialized, and traumatized dogs, and has pioneered the systematic use of play as part of their rehabilitation. She is the author of dozens of professional books, chapters, and articles about child/family therapy, play therapy, and dog training, the award-winning book Play Therapy with Kids & Canines, and the acclaimed Human Half of Dog Training: Collaborating with Clients to Get Results. She has received 12 national awards for her contributions to the field of psychology and her writing. Her latest book, Animal Assisted Play Therapy, will be published in 2017. Known for her warm, down-to-earth, lighthearted, and practical style, her past presentations at APDT and other conferences have been extremely well received. She is kept humble by her four dogs and three cats.

2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

The ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center: A Second Chance for Fearful Dogs

Kristin Collins, M.S., ACAAB, Senior Director, Anti-Cruelty Behavior Rehabilitation This talk will introduce the ASPCA’s groundbreaking work at our Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, a facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and study of fearful, under-socialized dogs. Attendees will learn about problematic behaviors commonly seen in canine victims of cruelty and neglect, behavior modification and enrichment strategies designed to reduce fear and improve adoptability, our research design and goals, and some of our early discoveries. The workshop will include video footage and time for Q&A. Intended audience: animal behavior experts and animal welfare professionals and volunteers who evaluate, rehabilitate, place and/or provide care for fearful dogs.
Kristen Collins, Senior Director of Anti-Cruelty Behavior Rehabilitation, oversees the operation of the ASPCA’s Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, a facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and study of fearful, under-socialized dogs. Her previous work includes conducting behavior evaluations to determine the best outcome for animals rescued from dog fighting, puppy mill and hoarding situations, designing and implementing shelter behavior modification and enrichment programs, conducting animal behavior research, writing and editing articles on animal behavior, and speaking on animal behavior topics at professional and academic conferences. Kristen is an Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and holds a master’s degree in applied animal behavior from the University of Illinois.

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

iFetch Give A Grand Reception


iFetch Give A Grand Reception:


iFetch helps APDT Give Back and Give Big! Attendees can bring a toy or donation for Richmond SPCA. A night of paying it forward begins with heavy hors d’oeuvres and cash bar, and then moves into a live auction to benefit the APDT Foundation. We will end the night with a heartfelt movie about giving back. (see description below.) iFetch donates a GRAND at the end of the night! Log onto goifetch.com for more info. IFetch – the automatic ball launcher for fetch loving dogs.

“Second Chance Dogs” movie– courtesy of ASPCA®


The ASPCA documentary, “Second Chance Dogs,” takes viewers behind the scenes of the ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center and follows six dogs rescued from cruel conditions and given new hope for happy lives. Through innovative therapies and dedication to recovery, behavior experts at the Rehab Center help these vulnerable and victimized dogs become suitable for adoption.

“Animals traumatized and betrayed by abuse and neglect are still at risk when adoption is not yet appropriate, but programs like the Behavioral Rehabilitation Center help rebuild their trust so they can be placed in safe and loving homes,” said Matthew Bershadker, President and CEO of the ASPCA. “Watching this process unfold in “Second Chance Dogs” helps people understand that we can change the fate of these animals when we understand the possibilities and commit ourselves to that goal.”

A question and answer session will be held after the movie screening with Kristin Collins.

7:00 am - 6:00 pm

Registration Open


8:00 am - 8:45 am

Sara Beth Pinson, Ph.D., CPDT-KA, CTDI This presentation will include details on how to:
• determine when it is time to implement a BMP
• develop an effective BMP
• evaluate a dog’s progress once they have a BMP
• improve client relations through proper communication of the purpose, necessity, and benefits of BMPs so clients understand and support the management decisions
• encourage animal caretakers to take a proactive approach to playgroup management
• improve workplace satisfaction for animal caretakers
Combining her passions for animals, training, teaching, and writing, Sara Beth now works as the Manager of Hiring and Staff Development at Pawtropolis in Athens, Ga., where she leads more than 50 staff in providing exceptional care for pets. She teaches all of the animal caretakers to think like trainers when they’re managing playgroups so that the dogs and staff can be as safe and healthy as possible while still having a good time. She also teaches agility and trick dog classes at Canine Capers Agility Club and is a professional member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer – Knowledge Assessed through the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers, and a Certified Trick Dog Instructor through Do More with Your Dog.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - Lessons Learned From A Former Victim of Cruelty

Andrea Kilkenny, M.A., CPDT-KA This short will be about sharing our lives with dogs who are former victims of cruelty and the challenges - and lessons - they bring to our lives, shown through the lens of a trainer who has not only helped countless dogs and their owners navigate the waters, but who is living with a dog from a large scale dog fighting case. Many trainers are called upon to work with dogs who are rescued from less than desirable circumstances. How can we help rescues and shelters appropriately place dogs who might require 'above and beyond?' How do we help adopters with integrating these dogs into their lives? What methods work? How can we help adopters make appropriate steps, while avoiding misinformation? What factors should we be looking at when making adoption matches? Andrea will be drawing on her experiences with her rescue dog, Finn, (aka "The Mighty Finn") a rescue from the second largest dog fighting case in the U.S., as well as her experiences helping owners with rescue dogs from cruelty, hoarding, and neglect cases. Finn is successfully living in a multi-dog, multi-cat household and has also become a helper dog at her business, working in particular with dogs who have reactive behavior or who are shy or fearful.
Andrea Kilkenny, M.A., CPDT-KA, is the owner of Our Gang Pet Services, LLC - a training and behavior consultation business in River Vale, NJ. Andrea has always been an animal lover, but her initial career was in Education; she was a high school Special Education teacher for students with behavioral disorders and also taught University classes for college students preparing to become educators. She studied Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis at University of Iowa where she completed her teaching certification, masters degree, and one year of a doctoral program. She worked in the Self-Injury and Aggression Clinic, and Bio-Behavioral Unit at U of I. During that time, she was also working at a city animal shelter, where her love of behavior and teaching others, drew her into the animal welfare field where she found she could apply her education skills. Andrea has worked at several municipal shelters and private shelters. She has served in those shelters as volunteer coordinator, animal care technician, clerk, animal control officer, adoption counselor and animal handler and trainer. She is also a responder with the ASPCA and has worked on the behavior team in their emergency shelters. It was a breakthrough - and career changing - moment when Andrea found she could combine her love of teaching and knowledge of behavior to working with animals. Her unique background in education and behavior with humans, and her experiences working in a wide range of roles in animal sheltering for two decades, help her bring a high level of expertise to her clients and their training needs. Andrea has worked as a trainer and behavior consultant at other agencies before starting her own business in 2012 and opening her 'brick and mortar' business in fall of 2013. Her business, Our Gang, offers group obedience classes at all levels, canine fitness and sport classes, CGC prep and testing, behavior modification services for dogs and cats, consulting services, and a day training program. Andrea shares her home with her dogs Finn, Maceo, Charlie and Page and two orange tabby cats, Viggo and Mush. She trains and competes in a number of dog sports, and enjoys playing and hiking with her dogs.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - Attachment Scales as a Tool for Behavior Consultants, Dog Trainers and Shelters

Melissa Hatfield, Masters Counseling Psychology; CBCC-KA with the CCPDT; CDBC with the IAABC There are multiple Assessment Scales available for the behaviorist, trainer and shelter who deal in the everyday care, training and assessment dogs. They address such topics as relinquishment, the human-dog bond, compatibility, predispositions to cruelty, overall attitudes in the care and treatment of dogs, children's experience attitude and treatment and how they can identify different family members perspectives on dog ownership.Examples with different common scenarios will be given. Attachment Theory will be defined and how research has compared the human-dog bond to that of the human-child relationship.The four characteristics of attachments will be reviewed; proximity maintenance, safe haven, secure base, and separation distress.
Melissa McMath Hatfield, M.S., CBCC-KA, CDBC, earned her master's in counseling psychology and is a retired licensed psychological examiner. Her mission is to enhance the human-dog relationship through understanding, knowledge and empathy. Currently she has a private consulting practice where her main focus is performing temperament assessments and behavior evaluations of dogs who are exhibiting mental health issues. She has been published in the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants Journal and gives lectures and presentations on how to identify a dogs specific emotional issue, and what to do to improve the dogs overall mental health.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Understanding and Applying the LIMA (Least Intrusive, Minimally Aversive) Approach

Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., CAAB The LIMA (Least Intrusive Minimally Aversive) approach provides both a standard and guidelines for working with dogs as effectively and humanely as possible. Understanding LIMA and applying it effectively will improve your effectiveness as a trainer and/or behaviorist. This talk will discuss the purpose and principles behind LIMA as well as the components of LIMA and its suggested hierarchy of behavior change. We will also discuss research examining the effectiveness and behavioral impacts of different training methodologies. Finally, the talk includes a review of basic principles of learning as needed to fully understand an in-depth discussion of LIMA.
Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., CAAB, owns Smart Dog Training and Behavior, LLC. She specializes in the prevention and treatment of behavior problems in dogs. Kristina has a Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience/Biopsychology. She studies the social cognition, evolution and behavior of dogs. Since 2010, Kristina has taught 14 undergraduate courses including Learning, Evolutionary Psychology, Statistics and Introduction to Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience. In 2012, she earned the Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student Award. She has also served as an invited presenter at several teaching workshops and presentations hosted by the University and was an invited speaker at the Evolutionary Studies Summit at SUNY New Paltz in 2012. She is also on the APDT’s education committee. Prior to opening Smart Dog in 2001, Kristina obtained her B.S. in Wildlife Ecology at the University at Wisconsin and served as an assistant trainer at Dog’s Best Friend, then owned by Dr. Patricia McConnell.

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Exhibit Hall Open


11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Break - Lunch Concessions Available for Purchase


11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Round Table Topics

Round Table Topics:
-Activism: How pet trainers can be active in changing pet laws in their city/state.
-How to better utilize technology in dog training.
-Building better relationships between local shelters and local trainers.
-How to emphasize trainer certification in marketing?
-Am I ready to start my own dog training business?
-Applying LIMA into your dog training.
-Why insurance? Which insurance?
-Making the most of your APDT membership.

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Reward for Caring: Generating ROI from Social Responsibility

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA Did you know you can get more exposure, grassroots marketing and customers from giving back to your community? Together we will cover the basics of social responsibility, the benefits, and how to implement intentional plans. From there, we will look at ways you can measure ROI and mechanisms for giving to your community.

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, is the Executive Director of Accounting & Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA. Born with an entreprenurial drive and passion for service, Ericka has over 15 years of professional experience in the nonprofit and business sectors. A business owner since sixth grade, she quickly grew her career in fundraising, grants, and nonprofit management. Ericka is responsible for raising $14 million in funds, service as a federal grant review chair, providing consulting services to nonprofits, co-founding a social enterprise catering company, and teaching communication and fundraising at the university level. To gain a broad foundation to build on, she pursued higher education in marketing and communication, earning a masters and bachelors in Communication, a bachelor's in marketing and is a Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Leadership concentrating on Nonprofit Leadership from Eastern University in St. David's, Penn. She currently serves on the board of directors for Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, Professional Women's Forum and God's Closet, Inc.

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

How Going Live Can Boost Your Business

Trevor Smith, CPDT-KA Do you know you can capture more leads for your dog training business with Facebook Live? Learn how going LIVE is not as scary as you think and is an easy way to boost your business. We will cover the Facebook Live basics as well as give you practical ways to market with this great tool on Facebook.
Trevor started training dogs at the age of six. At the age of sixteen, he began instructing his own private lessons and classes. With over twenty years of experience in training dogs, his passion is to use his experiences over the years to help people grow closer to their canine companions. In 2015, he launched a dog training educational platform called Doggie Dojo to help people discover the path to life with their dog. Through the use of both produced and live video marketing he has expanded his reach through Social media. In May of last year he was asked to join a team of broadcasters on The Pet Scope TV to do a show called Tricked Out with Doggie Dojo. In being a regular broadcaster for this online network, he was asked this last fall to be a live broadcaster from one of the largest, 36,000 members, dog training Facebook groups. On Modern Dog Training and Behavior Advice, he gives training tips on his show called The Doggie Dojo show.

12:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Citizen Scientist --Studying Sociability in Dogs

Dr. Tim Lewis and Sue Sternberg (Limited seats available) Dr. Tim Lewis and Sue Sternberg have been immersing dog trainers and shelter personnel into how the tools of science can make them better at understanding dogs. Their Canine Sociability Initiative includes a real-world project looking at the two-minute sociability test from Assess-A-Pet and its relationship with a new, ten-second sociability snapshot test that can be done while the dog is in his kennel. The project brings trainers and shelter personnel into the world of science by taking them step by step through the process of developing a hypothesis, designing an experiment, creating a scoring system, and collecting data. The results of this work are helping to quickly identify dogs at either extreme of sociability. Tim and Sue have been traveling and doing workshops in which participants are part of the process and seeing the data come forth in real time. Through extensive video footage of full sociability tests and the snapshots, participants can fully realize the process by experiencing every part of the research. During the workshop, we learn more about body language and behaviors by watching detailed video footage of shelter dogs, finding a scoring system that quantifies and qualifies the discrete behaviors identified in sociable dogs, non-sociable, and also aggressive dogs. The project hopes to find a quick, safe, simple-to-score (even by non-dog professionals), and scientifically-validated method of assessing the behavior of shelter dogs to identify the most sociable and most non-sociable with the potential for aggression. The snapshot test is not intended to replace a full assessment, but instead provides a way for shelters that currently do not assess because they perceive a lack of time or expertise, to be able to at least perform this new test. Practical uses include rural shelters with more dogs than adopters to use as a selection process for deciding which dogs to send on transports and is useful for anyone needing a quick assessment of dog sociability.

1:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Break


1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

The Behavioral Economics of Your Dog's Behavior: Preference, Reinforcement, and Training

Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA The effectiveness of reinforcers is essential to training. So, how do we assess how effective a reinforcer is? A common way is assessing preference for an item or an interaction as a reinforcer. We will evaluate recent studies looking at dogs’ preferences for different human interactions--a study from 2016 suggested dogs prefer praise as much as food, but there's ample evidence to the contrary and we will discuss! Additionally, preference doesn’t give us the whole picture; preference for something doesn’t always mean it will be an effective reinforcer. To look at how preference and reinforcer effectiveness interact, we will use behavioral economics, which deals with how much behavior a reinforcer can maintain. We will delve into this field and discuss the effect of unit price, delay, elasticity of commodities (reinforcers), as well as what it means to have substitutable or complementary reinforcers. We will discuss how we can apply these topics to improve our dog training, as well as better understand our own behavior. Throughout, we will look at data from humans, traditional lab animals, and, of course, dogs!
Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA, is an Assistant Professor of Anthrozoology at Carroll College in Helena, MT. There she is the canine specialist, leading the program in which students train and foster dogs during the academic year. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Florida under Dr. Clive Wynne in the UF Canine Cognition and Behavior Lab and her Masters in Behavior Analysis under Dr. Jesus Rosales-Ruiz. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, has attended the SF SPCA Dog Trainer Academy, and has worked as a shelter behaviorist. She has published a variety of scientific articles on her research on learning theory and the dog-human relationship. She has taught Principles of Behavior Analysis, Learning and Cognition, Basic and Advanced Canine Training, and Research Methods. She has earned awards for her behavior analytic research on dog behavior. Her research interests center on dog-human social interactions, improving shelter dog welfare, and assessing training techniques.

1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

Beware! Aggression in Dogs

Pat Miller The vast majority of the time when the human is committed to implementing the management and modification protocols presented, their dogs are successful at learning how to live in their world without resorting to aggression. This session is intended to give the attendee a better understanding of canine aggression, what it is, and what causes it, along with a review of science-based, force-free protocols for successful management and modification of aggression.
Pat Miller has been training dogs for more than 35 years. As a child, Pat was the one who taught the family dog to sit, lie down, and jump over broomsticks in the living room. Her professional life has always involved animals, first as a horse trainer in Wisconsin, then for 20 years as a humane officer at the Marin Humane society in California, and most recently as a certified professional dog trainer and behavior consultant. She launched her own dog training company on the West Coast in 1996, after five years assisting nationally acclaimed obedience instructor Judie Howard of Arydith Obedience, and relocated the Peaceable Paws Dog and Puppy Training Center to Chattanooga, Tenn., in the year 2000, then to its present 80-acre campus in Fairplay, Md., in April of 2004. Pat received her CPDT-KA certification as a professional dog trainer from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers in September of 2001, one of the first 136 trainers in the world to attain this title. Pat is also a freelance writer and author, regularly contributing articles on dog behavior and training to The Whole Dog Journal, Your Dog (a publication of Tufts University's Veterinary School), and several other publications. She is also Training Editor for The Whole Dog Journal. Her first dog training book, The Power of Positive Dog Training was released by Howell Book House in August of 2001 and has been on Amazon.com’s "Top 10 Dog Training Books" list since January of 2002. Her other books are: Positive Perspectives, Positive Perspectives 2, and Play With Your Dog. A "cross-over" trainer, Pat started her long dog-training career using "old-fashioned" methods that relied on the use of force-based tools and methods – jerks on the choke chain, harsh verbal corrections – and successfully earned numerous obedience titles with a variety of dogs, including a Rough Collie, a Bull Terrier, an Australian Kelpie, a Pomeranian, and Josie, her wonderful Terrier mix. It was Josie who convinced her to cross over to force-free methods, and she is now fully committed to science-based, positive reinforcement training. Pat shares her Fairplay home with husband Paul, and their five dogs (Missy, Dubhy, Lucy, Scooter and Bonnie); three cats (Barney, Viva and Blue); five horses (Molly, Rafiki, Levi, Mikey and Olivia); one donkey (Joan); and one pot-bellied pig (Sturgis). They also operate Peaceable Pastures, a horse-friendly boarding facility.

1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

How to Be a Diplomat - Making Peace Among Cats and Dogs

Steve Dale, CABC A quarter of pet homes have at least one dog and one cat. What do clients do when they’re fighting like cats and dogs? Integrating a dog in a home filled with felines, or introducing a cat into a house with a dog, a step-by-step description and tools to set up clients for success. Also discussed will be common inter-species behavior issues, such as dogs who like snacking from the litter box or scarfing down the cat’s food, to cats who run outside the door when it’s opened for dogs to take a walk.
Steve Dale, CABC (certified animal behavior consultant) is host of two national radio shows (Black Dog Radio Productions), Steve Dale’s Pet World, The Pet Minute) and Steve Dale’s Pet World on WGN Radio, Chicago. For 21 year years he authored a Tribune syndicated national newspaper column. His blog is at www.stevedale.tv. His many TV appearances range from Oprah to National Geographic Explorer to a wide variety of Animal Planet programs, and as a former contributor to superstation WGN. He’s currently a regular on nationally syndicated “HouseSmarts TV.” Among his books, are two ebooks “Good Dog!” and “Good Cat!” He’s a co-editor of “Decoding Your Dog” (authored by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists). He’s a contributor to “The Cat: Clinical Medicine and Management” (edited Dr. Susan Little), “Treatment and Care of the Geriatric Veterinary Patient” (edited Dr. Mary Gardner and Dr. Dani McVety, 2017), and others. He has written forewords and introductions to many books. Steve’s a columnist at Veterinary Practice News, and CATster. Formerly he was the pet editor at USA Weekend. He speaks at veterinary and animal welfare conferences around the world. Steve’s earned multiple awards for his work including the AVMA Humane Award, and is the youngest person inducted into the Dog Writer’s Hall of Fame. Steve serves on the Boards of the Winn Feline Foundation American Association of Human-Animal Bond Veterinarians. He’s a past Board Member of the American Humane Association, and he’s a founder and past Board member of the CATalyst Council. He’s also scientific advisor at Pet Partners. And he’s on the Advisory Board of SPCA Puerto Vallarta, and others.

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Panel - Safety vs. Autonomy - What's the Trade Off?

Chris Zink, DVM, Ph.D., DACVP, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVSMT, CVA; Pat Miller, B.S., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., CAAB; Steve Dale, CABA (moderator) Join this panel in an interactive discussion moderated by radio personality, Steve Dale. In today's society, most dogs don't live the lives they were bred for. We provide them with the best medical care, they are safer than ever and are considered party of the family. What are the costs to dogs living these safer lives, and how can we keep them happy?

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Exhibit Hall Open & Closing Reception


7:00 am - 3:00 pm

Registration Open


8:00 am - 8:45 am

Draw your dog a picture (or why I won't teach OFF)

Barbara Miller If you cannot draw a simple stick figure drawing of what you are asking the dog to do then you are starting with too difficult a concept. Simplify by working with visual goals to shape the learning process for the HUMANS. Yes, humans can understand the basics and dogs are more than capable of mastering concepts. We are better served as positive trainers to begin shaping the thought processes of our new clients. "What do you want the dog to do" gets lost in the shuffle of new puppy mayhem and reduced to "no!, stop!, bad dog!" We need to begin shaping the thought processes of our clients by adding skills in a way that changes how they approach a problem. If the skill set is not in place, when the distractions and stress of the moment engage the brain, we will all be reduced to our earlier, deeply ingrained behaviors. We are all better served to be open and accepting of where each learner starts and shape the way that best suits their background. If people are put on the defensive, we lose them. What we see as obvious may not be to your clients. Let's shed our own assumptions and embrace our clients wherever they are in the positive paradigm. Real change begins there.
Owner of Brookside Pet Training Studio for Dogs, a positive training facility in midtown KC. Ran Brookside Pet Concierge for 14 years before that. MBA, Organizational Behavior (University of Missouri, Kansas City), BS, Journalism (University of Florida.) I studied with Karen Pryor Academy in 2009, achieved my CPDT-KA two years after that. Also a CGC Evaluator. Attended Ken Ramirez "Professional Trainers Seminar" at Shedd Aquarium in 2011. Completed Dr. Friedman's "Living and Learning with Animals" course. Worked in Broadcast television as a Technical Director and Video Tape Editor until switching to freelance to stay home with my young kids. My dog business was started while I stayed home with my kids. My training emphasis is in family manners and living positively / successfully with animals. I currently live with a 13 yrs old Weimaraner, a 2 yr old Flat Coated Retriever, and a 14 yr old cantankerous Tortie named Jambi. Now that our kids are out of the house, I am enjoying learning dog sports with my young dog.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

The Cognitive Revolution and Everyday Dog Training

Laura Donaldson, Ph.D., CDBC, KPA-CTP One common truism in dog training is the notion that giving a dog food rewards in the presence of a trigger will not only inhibit any fear and anxiety that the dog is experiencing, but also teach the dog to "like" the scary person feeding the treat or the dog passing by. However, recent research on the use of systematic desensitization/counter-conditioning with non-human animals challenges this premise. This research suggests that inducing a subject cognitively to accept the concerning stimulus -- that is, to acknowledge and process information about it -- provides a much more significant reduction in fearful, anxious behavior than just feeding or rewarding the animal in proximity to the trigger. I will discuss this research and talk about some ways that this cognitive perspective on desensitization/counter-conditioning might make how we use this technique in everyday dog training much more precise and effective. Some of the questions that the presentation will address include: How might learning more about canine cognition change the protocols that dog trainers use for desensitization/counter-conditioning? What would a cognitive protocol for desensitization/counter-conditioning look like? And finally, how would this new information transform what we do on a daily basis with our own dogs and our clients' dogs?
Laura Donaldson, Ph.D., CDBC, KPA-CTP, is a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant through the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants and a Certified Training Partner through the Karen Pryor Academy for Animal Training & Behavior. In a previous life, Laura was a Professor of humanities at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Since 2006, however, she has been the owner of Four Paws, Four Directions Dog Training & Behavior Consulting, LLC (https://fourpawsfourdirections.com), located in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. She is also the lead behavior and training consultant for Cayuga Dog Rescue, a non-profit organization also based in Ithaca. Laura has a longstanding interest in the emerging research on cognition in animals with a special focus on dogs and has published on this topic in the IAABC Journal (summer 2017 issue). She plans to offer a semi-regular column on this topic in upcoming issues. When Laura is not training, working with or writing about dogs, she enjoys herding her small flock of sheep with her Border Collies and training her Golden Retriever for tracking.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts - Be a Better Teacher, Be a Better Trainer

Rachel Brix, CPDT-KA I will demonstrate how to construct a solid dog training lesson geared toward people that appeals to a variety of learning styles in a fun and interactive way. The basics will include identifying training objectives and how to organize lessons based on the objectives while also emphasizing effective time management. We will also cover different methods to check for understanding and look at how building confidence in pet parents’ abilities correlates with their dogs’ success. Discussions will show connections between how both dogs and people learn and how you can use these similarities to maximize training sessions.
Rachel Brix, CPDT-KA, is a veteran high school teacher who resigned to pursue a full-time career with dogs. After being Lead Trainer at Petco she went on to run her own grooming and training business. Her passion is rescue dogs, and she has managed two animal shelters. She trains shelter staffs on dog training and behavior modification and provides animal shelter consulting. Rachel’s personal philosophy of dog training includes a major community involvement component; to that end she spearheaded and continues to chair the committee that built Carroll County, Arkansas’ first and only dog park. She is also very involved with diverse animal advocacy efforts. In addition to working on the campaign for what eventually became Missouri’s Canine Cruelty Prevention Act and various other dog-related initiatives in the region, she most recently pioneered the first and only city-wide wild animal circus ban in Arkansas that passed in 2015. Also a writer, she will be published in the summer 2017 issue of The APDT Chronicle of the Dog. Rachel is a Canine Good Citizen Evaluator and provides consulting, private lessons and group training classes. She lives in northwest Arkansas with her husband and six rescue animals.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Dominance: Myth or Fact? A Detailed Look at What the Science Says

Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., CAAB This talk will focus on the subject of dominance and dominance hierarchies from an ethological perspective. We will first discuss the definition of dominance in the scientific literature and the function of dominance hierarchies in social species. Then we'll take a detailed look at the research on dominance in wolves and domestic dogs and the discussions taking place in the scientific literature. Move away from the rhetoric and focus on the facts to enhance your understanding of dog behavior and your training and behavior modification methodologies
Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., CAAB, owns Smart Dog Training and Behavior, LLC. She specializes in the prevention and treatment of behavior problems in dogs. Kristina has a PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience/Biopsychology. She studies the social cognition, evolution and behavior of dogs. Since 2010, Kristina has taught 14 undergraduate courses including Learning, Evolutionary Psychology, Statistics and Introduction to Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience. In 2012, she earned the Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student Award. She has also served as an invited presenter at several teaching workshops and presentations hosted by the University and was an invited speaker at the Evolutionary Studies Summit at SUNY New Paltz in 2012. She is also on the APDT’s education committee. Prior to opening Smart Dog in 2001, Kristina obtained her B.S. in Wildlife Ecology at the University at Wisconsin and served as an assistant trainer at Dog’s Best Friend, then owned by Dr. Patricia McConnell.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

The Power of Single-subject Research Designs to Enhance Training Practices to Research

Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., CPDT-KA, BCBA-D The world of dog training is full of interesting but unanswered questions. It is also full of dedicated, passionate, and scientifically-minded practitioners who constitute an enormous source of manpower to help answer these questions. Certain behavioral research designs from the field of behavior analysis are uniquely suited to answering training and behavior questions, and to being used by committed practitioners, thereby contributing to our scientific field and our applied field of training. These research designs are called small n, or single-subject designs and are experimentally powerful designs, although they are often misinterpreted by lay audiences who have been taught to look mainly at the sample size as a guide for research quality. In this workshop, we will guide attendees through the steps of designing a research study, and, will detail the various single subject designs and why they are more powerful than group designs. We will use our own research into dog behavior, learning, and welfare to demonstrate these designs. We will discuss why they are particularly well-suited to animal trainers who wish to contribute scientifically to their field. We will discuss each design’s advantages and disadvantages, and what questions each is best suited for, and how to mix-and-match these designs to make the strongest experimental design for your question. We will discuss and practice how to systematically observe and measure behavior, as well as which measures are best suited for different types of behavior. We will then delve into how to interpret results from your research, and how to make data-based decision in terms of where to go next with your research as well as with your clients. Attendees will practice working through designing experiments using research ideas provided to them. However, one goal of the workshop is for attendees to leave with a research project they could implement. We will ask attendees to bring research ideas that they can develop and get feedback on during the workshop. Using their own research questions to design a study. We will give personal feedback to the attendees to design an experiment for their question, including operational definitions for the behavior, how to measure the behavior, how to ensure and measure treatment integrity, and how to interpret their results. While the workshop is geared for those interested in contributing scientifically, the same experimental designs, controls, and behavioral measures are used to make data-based training decisions. Thus, the workshop is appropriate for all trainers who want to ensure that their intervention is having the desired outcome, and to enhance trainer’s ability to make effective training decisions based on accurate measures of behavior change—that is, to train scientifically.
Erica Feuerbacher, M.S., Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA is an Assistant Professor of Anthrozoology at Carroll College in Helena, MT. There she is the canine specialist, leading the program in which students train and foster dogs during the academic year. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Florida under Dr. Clive Wynne in the UF Canine Cognition and Behavior Lab and her Masters in Behavior Analysis under Dr. Jesus Rosales-Ruiz. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, has attended the SF SPCA Dog Trainer Academy, and has worked as a shelter behaviorist. She has published a variety of scientific articles on her research on learning theory and the dog-human relationship. She has taught Principles of Behavior Analysis, Learning and Cognition, Basic and Advanced Canine Training, and Research Methods. She has earned awards for her behavior analytic research on dog behavior. Her research interests center on dog-human social interactions, improving shelter dog welfare, and assessing training techniques.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Natural Methods to Positive Behavior

Meg Harrison Want positive, permanent results? Here are natural solutions to difficult and/or chronic behavior problems. Blends of flower essences, therapeutic-grade essential oils and homeopathic remedies have been "field tested" for 40 years on 1,000's in training, in shelter settings, plus before, during, and after natural disasters.
Meg Harrison, flower essence expert specializing in animal behavior, has successfully helped thousands of behaviorally-challenged animals using unique blends of essences, essential oils, and/or homeopathic remedies. Working with trainers, health care practitioners, rescuers, fosters, clinics, and shelters nationwide, she facilitates positive change in the vast majority of cases, no matter how difficult or emotionally damaged. Her bio includes experience with 14 California wildfires, hands-on work in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and during Hurricane Rita, 2 F-5 Texas tornadoes, rehabilitating rescues from puppy mills, hoarding cases, court ordered seizures, research labs, captured Mustangs, dogs, feral and community cats, plus farm animals rescued from slaughter and re-homed quickly adjusting to their new environments thus the outstanding success in shelter settings. For 40 years, she has advocated for gentler, more effective ways to improve overall well-being and behavioral health of 24 species including humans sharing her experiences and hard-won knowledge with anyone who would listen whether in a lecture hall, walking shelter dogs, or during a natural disaster.

11:00 am - 11:15 am

Break


11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Writing and Publishing Books About Dogs and Dog Training

Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., CAAB Have you ever wondered how authors find time to write? How to select the best publisher for your book? Or just wondered about what it's really like to publish and promote a book on a national level? Join Patricia for a talk on the ins and outs of the publishing world, from small booklets to best sellers.
Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., CAAB, is an ethologist who has consulted for over twenty years about serious behavioral problems in dogs. She taught, "The Biology and Philosophy of Human/Animal Relationships," in the Department of Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for twenty five-years and speaks around the world about canine behavior and training. Dr. McConnell is the author of eleven books on training and behavioral problems, as well as the critically acclaimed books The Other End of the Leash (translated into 14 languages), For the Love of a Dog, and Tales of Two Species. Her newest book, The Education of Will, is a memoir focusing on healing from trauma in both people and dogs. Patricia and her husband live with their working Border Collies, Willie and Maggie, her King Charles Cavalier Spaniel, and Tootsie, along with a very spoiled flock of sheep. For more information, go to www.patriciamcconnell.com or visit her blog at www.theotherendoftheleash.com.

11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Socialize Your Dog Training Business with Content Marketing on Social Media

Trevor Smith. CPDT-KA The marketing game has a new name and it is called social media. Now is the time to capture the people around you through getting over you fears and finally taking the next step to socialize your dog training business. In a sea of content that is being pushed to these platforms on a daily basis, it can be difficult to stand out. With the use of video, you can diversify your dog training business from the crowd. Now that platforms have provided the ability to shoot live video, expanding your reach has never been easier. Though social media can be a bit overwhelming, there are some simple steps that you can make to create quality content for people in your community.
Trevor started training dogs at the age of six. At the age of sixteen, he began instructing his own private lessons and classes. With over twenty years of experience in training dogs, his passion is to use his experiences over the years to help people grow closer to their canine companions. In 2015, he launched a dog training educational platform called Doggie Dojo to help people discover the path to life with their dog. Through the use of both produced and live video marketing he has expanded his reach through Social media. In May of last year he was asked to join a team of broadcasters on The Pet Scope TV to do a show called Tricked Out with Doggie Dojo. In being a regular broadcaster for this online network, he was asked this last fall to be a live broadcaster from one of the largest, 36,000 members, dog training Facebook groups. On Modern Dog Training and Behavior Advice, he gives training tips on his show called The Doggie Dojo show.

12:15 pm - 1:15 pm

Break - Lunch Concessions Available for Purchase


12:15 pm - 1:15 pm

Round Table Topics

Round Table Topics:
-Licensing of dog trainers: pros and cons
-Raw food, kibble and everything in-between. What should dogs be eating?
-New training techniques in 2017.
-Safety First!
-How to apply research to everyday training.
-Having a specialty vs. Jack of all trades.
-Should you go to a dog training school?
-Maximizing your presence on social media.
-Implement the APDT Body of Knowledge (BOK) into your trainer education.

1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Tips and Tricks for Detecting Subtle Injuries That Can Derail Training

Chris Zink, DVM, Ph.D., DACVP, DACVSMR, CCRT, CVSMT, CVA As predators, dogs are hard-wired to hide pain. If you asked your dog to give you a pain scale between 0 and 10 (like you get when you go to the emergency room), most dogs would say that the scale is 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Many dogs live with subtle soft-tissue injuries that, at worst, cause significant pain, or at the very least distract the dogs. These subtle injuries prevent dogs from behaving optimally, whether it is in a formal competition, or even just when interacting with other dogs. Unfortunately dogs usually hide these injuries so well that their people have no idea they exist. This interactive talk uses numerous high resolution video clips of real case studies to demonstrate how, with your own smart phone and some basic observational skills, you can make sure that your dog feels healthy and isn't hiding a painful condition.
Dr. Chris Zink is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, which she helped to establish. She consults with clients on canine sports medicine, designing individual rehabilitation and conditioning programs for canine athletes. She teaches canine sports medicine to veterinarians and physical therapists worldwide. Additionally, she is a certified therapist in canine rehabilitation, veterinary spinal manipulation, and veterinary acupuncture. Dr. Zink was named the 2009 Woman Veterinarian of the Year by the Association for Women Veterinarians Foundation. She is author and co-editor of the award-winning text "Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation," the first veterinary textbook on this topic and of numerous other books on canine sports medicine. As a competitor, she has put over 100 titles on her dogs in agility, obedience, conformation, tracking, hunt tests, barn hunts, nosework and rally. Dr. Zink currently competes with her Golden Retriever, Hobby, and her Norwich Terrier, Helix.

1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

So You Want to be an Advocate? Finding and Changing Animal Laws in Your Community

Debra Griggs, president, VA Federation of Humane Societies; Sue Bell, executive director of Homeward Trails Animal Rescue; Matthew Gray, Virginia State Director for The Humane Society of the United States; Heidi Meinzer, JD, CPDT-KSA, CNWI, APDT board member (moderator) Animal welfare is a bipartisan topic that has recently taken a high priority in local, state and federal legislation. There have been an explosion of proposed legislation and laws touching on our companion animals, on issues as broad as breed discriminatory laws, damages for injury or death of a dog or cat, animal shelter regulation, and pet shops and puppy mills. Your legislators need to hear from you as stakeholders and constituents with interest and experience in dog training and behavior. Finding the laws that impact you and your companion animals – and the legislators who have the biggest influence – can be daunting. Also, the process of changing those laws can be confusing and intimidating. This presentation will give you guidance about where to find relevant federal, state and local laws, as well as how to identify key legislators. We will also empower you with the confidence to approach legislators to improve animal related laws. We’ll give you a road map, along with real world examples of how Virginia animal advocates have united through the Virginia Federation of Humane Societies and the HSUS to bring about positive change for animals.
Debra Griggs is the president of the Virginia Federation of Humane Societies. She founded Animal Resources of Tidewater, and was the founding chair of the Animal Welfare Coalition of Hampton Roads. Previously she was president of the Junior League of Norfolk-Virginia Beach, chair of the Ryan White Care Consortium, chair of the Women’s Multicultural Coalition and served on the board of the Hampton Roads REALTORS Association. Her volunteerism was recognized when she received the 2010 Converse College Alumni Community Service Award. Debra is a committed advocate for the under-served and has a personal passion for ending discrimination – whether it is based upon gender, race, ethnicity, or those marginalized by circumstance as in the case of homelessness and AIDS. In her current role as an animal welfare advocate, she is a leader in the effort to end dog breed discrimination. Debra is the managing broker of RE/MAX Ambassadors in Norfolk and shares her home in Norfolk with husband, Steve, a retired engineer and their beloved dogs, Cotton, Marley, Chewie and Ralph. Sue Bell is the executive director of Homeward Trails Animal Rescue, Inc. (Homeward Trails), a private shelter in Northern Virginia that has placed over 20,000 dogs and cats since its inception in 2001. Sue serves on the VFHS Board, and has consulted with many Virginia lawmakers, localities and advocates to help implement animal friendly laws. Matthew Gray is the Virginia State Director for The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Matt is a Richmond, Va., native who brings extensive grassroots organizing, fundraising and political experience to his role, having served previously as the executive director of the Virginia Public Safety Foundation.

1:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Enrichment in Richmond

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA We care for an average of 100 dogs and 150 cats at the Richmond SPCA and keeping them safe and sane while they are in our care in job #1. Medical care is critical --- and behavior modification is often required, but much of what we do is daily kennel enrichment. In this presentation, we'll examine some of our best-of-breed programs (Running Buddies, FOCUS list, quiet time, play groups, Animal Brigade, etc), highlight best-of-breed programs at other shelters, and look at enrichment plans that would work for individual pets living in a home.
Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

3:15 pm - 3:30 pm

Break


3:30 pm -

CLOSING KEYNOTE: +R Training: The Force Free Movement

Pat Miller As a cross-over trainer, Pat is proud to be recognized as one of the pioneers in the industry's quantum shift from almost universally coercion-based training to the widespread acceptance today of force-free training methods. Along with that shift has come a monumental surge of trainers who are intrigued and compelled by the science of behavior and learning. We now very much care about the "why," not just the "how." Such was not always the case. Join Pat in a review of this journey; a discussion of the current state of the industry; a hopeful glimpse into the future - and how we might continue to influence the direction of our profession.
Pat Miller has been training dogs for more than 35 years. As a child, Pat was the one who taught the family dog to sit, lie down, and jump over broomsticks in the living room. Her professional life has always involved animals, first as a horse trainer in Wisconsin, then for 20 years as a humane officer at the Marin Humane society in California, and most recently as a certified professional dog trainer and behavior consultant. She launched her own dog training company on the West Coast in 1996, after five years assisting nationally acclaimed obedience instructor Judie Howard of Arydith Obedience, and relocated the Peaceable Paws Dog and Puppy Training Center to Chattanooga, Tenn., in the year 2000, then to its present 80-acre campus in Fairplay, Md., in April of 2004. Pat received her CPDT-KA certification as a professional dog trainer from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers in September of 2001, one of the first 136 trainers in the world to attain this title. Pat is also a freelance writer and author, regularly contributing articles on dog behavior and training to The Whole Dog Journal, Your Dog (a publication of Tufts University's Veterinary School), and several other publications. She is also Training Editor for The Whole Dog Journal. Her first dog training book, The Power of Positive Dog Training was released by Howell Book House in August of 2001 and has been on Amazon.com’s "Top 10 Dog Training Books" list since January of 2002. Her other books are: Positive Perspectives, Positive Perspectives 2, and Play With Your Dog. A "cross-over" trainer, Pat started her long dog-training career using "old-fashioned" methods that relied on the use of force-based tools and methods – jerks on the choke chain, harsh verbal corrections – and successfully earned numerous obedience titles with a variety of dogs, including a Rough Collie, a Bull Terrier, an Australian Kelpie, a Pomeranian, and Josie, her wonderful Terrier mix. It was Josie who convinced her to cross over to force-free methods, and she is now fully committed to science-based, positive reinforcement training. Pat shares her Fairplay home with husband Paul, and their five dogs (Missy, Dubhy, Lucy, Scooter and Bonnie); three cats (Barney, Viva and Blue); five horses (Molly, Rafiki, Levi, Mikey and Olivia); one donkey (Joan); and one pot-bellied pig (Sturgis). They also operate Peaceable Pastures, a horse-friendly boarding facility.

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