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Conference Schedule

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: K9 Nose Work for the Shelter & Special Needs Dog

Jill Marie O'Brien, CPDT-KA, CNWI

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

This workshop is designed to address the unique needs of implementing a K9 NoseWork program in the shelter environment, rescue group or for special needs dogs. The focus will be on the basic concepts and foundation skills for dogs and handlers as part of a shelter/rescue enrichment program. Live demonstrations with shelter/foster dogs and video will be used. For trainers with clients with dogs that have been unsuccessful in other classes or activities, this is an easy to implement activity for any companion dog and owner. We will cover the application and foundation of K9 Nose Work and its practical use in the shelter environment, as well as the basics for getting a program started in a facility. Scenting is a natural and often under-utilized activity for dogs; K9 Nose Work offers dogs both a mental and physical outlet for the stress that can often build from confinement.

Jill Marie O’Brien, CCPDT-KA, has been working with, training and advocating for dogs since 1986; fourteen of those years were spent as Director of Behavior and Training Services for the SPCA-LA. During her tenure with SPCA-LA, she supervised the creation and ongoing development of that agency's first Animal Behavior and Training Department since its inception in 1877. She has worked on a number of projects including the Kal-Kan Bite Prevention and Feral Dog Safety program; Teaching Love and Compassion (TLC), a program that matches at-risk youth with shelter dogs to help build conflict resolution, develop appropriate anger management control skills for youth participants and enhance the dog's adoptability and many additional programs. Jill Marie is also the co-founder of the National Association of K9 Scent Work program.

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: Canine Fitness Foundation Fun

Lisa Blanchard, B.A., LVT, CMT, CCRP

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

This workshop offers insight into using the latest developments in canine-specific equipment and the training techniques needed to create fun, effective and safe exercises for dogs. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of form and technique and how to recognize the signs of fatigue. Trainers will have the chance to utilize various training methods (luring, shaping, capturing, and targeting) in a hands-on approach to work with dogs on equipment.

Lisa began formally training dogs in 1991. Since that time, she has been actively competing in multiple venues. With her dogs, she has achieved titles in conformation, agility, rally, obedience, lure coursing and scent work. Her competition background has been a complement to working with athletes. Lisa started her formal journey into the world of canine physical rehabilitation because she felt that her own competition dogs were in need of bodywork. She became certified in canine massage therapy in 2004 which sparked a desire to learn more, so she changed careers, became a Licensed Veterinary Technician and a Certified Rehabilitation Practitioner (CCRP) through the University of Tennessee's Canine Rehabilitation Program. For eight years, Lisa worked exclusively in the field of rehabilitation. In her years of veterinary practice, Lisa has had the pleasure of working to aid with the rehabilitation of family pets, rescue animals, service dogs, show dogs and canine athletes. As a fellow competitor, she understands canine sports and their rigorous requirements. Through her own business, K9 Fitness Coach, LLC, she develops customized fitness plans, seminars and classes focusing on the importance of fitness, balance and core strength for the canine athlete. Her classes and seminars aim to teach the significance of injury prevention and stress the importance of foundation exercises and behavioral cues. In a quest to expand her knowledge-base, Lisa discovered the Certified Canine Fitness Trainer (CCFT) program. She was intrigued by how the program blended physical and mental fitness together to offer a "total" challenge to the dog. Lisa Completed the CCFT program in 2016. She has since been added to the team of FitPAWS CCFT Instructors and has joined FitPAWS full time as their Education Program Consultant. Lisa lives in Michigan with her two Dobermans (Rylan an Dante) and her husband of 27 years, Tom.

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

WORKSHOP: Dog Agility: Over, Under, Through

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA

Conference Workshops sponsored by PetSafe

*Workshops have limited space available
**Pre-registration and separate fee applies

Agility is the most popular dog sport in the world --- and also one of the most fun things you can do with your dog. Agility classes usually fill quickly and students attend for a wide variety of reasons. Well-structured agility classes can build confidence in shy dogs, channel excess energy in young dogs, keep older dogs active, and forge the bond between dog and handler. At the Richmond SPCA, we teach over 32 agility classes a week and have multiple students who have had the same dog in classes for over 10 years. About 2/3 of our advanced students get hooked on some level of competition and the other 1/3 simply see it as a great opportunity to spend quality time with their dog.

In this daylong workshop, we will look at a variety of topics related to teaching agility, including ideal class structure, building a solid curriculum, teaching so students “hear” you, student retention, dealing with tricky students/dogs, and general problem-solving. We will also look at topics related to running agility, including the big five reasons things don’t work the way you think they should, either in class or at trials. If you or your students are having any trouble at all, the answer is probably here. We will also address how to include agility as part of a shelter dog enrichment program --- and participants will get to help a few lucky pups get started on their agility careers.

Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

10:00 am - 11:00 am

KEYNOTE: Partner Up: Approaches to Working Hand-in Hand with Your Shelter

Mark Peralta Marc details different specific needs that shelters have for behavioral experts and different ways trainers and behavioral experts are needed to keep animals healthy and getting adopted in shelters. Also, he will explain how behavioral experts can help animals from entering or returning to shelters.
Marc Peralta is the executive director for Best Friend Animal Society - Los Angeles. In 2011, Los Angeles was struggling to save just over half of the cats and dogs entering our city shelters, and under Marc's leadership, LA is on target to meet a 90% save rate by the end of 2017. Marc’s duties as executive director specifically include the operations for the Best Friend’s Pet Adoption Center in Mission Hills, Calif., the NKLA Pet Adoption Center in West Los Angles as well as leading the 119 group and growing NKLA coalition. Marc also served as vice president and chief operating officer as well as interim CEO at the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PSPCA) located in Philadelphia, Penn. In addition to his duties at the Pennsylvania SPCA, Marc also served as a member of the board of directors for the Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia. Prior to the PSPCA, Marc worked in animal care managerial roles at the Nevada Humane Society in Reno, Nev., and the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region in Colorado Springs, Colo.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Everyday Tech: Managing Your Digital Life

Bill Dotson Get ready to take your understanding of everyday technology to the next level. Join Bill as he explains in easy to understand terms how to use the apps, websites and tools people use to make their day more efficient while staying safe. You'll learn about apps, websites, and services to help you with: - scheduling, marketing, and research - finding out if you have a good password - how to manage the 9,999 passwords you have - how to protect your home laptop and mobile phone - how to determine if you've been involved in a hack Somehow, Bill does all of this without using any acronyms or tech jargon. You may even get a tour of the dark web...
Bill Dotson is a speaker, technology consultant, and entrepreneur who has over 20 years of experience helping others understand and use the Internet to reach their goals. Bill speaks to thousands of people each year about the best technology to use to solve problems and achieve their goals. He is a father of three, a Lexington Ky., native, and believes in lifelong learning for everyone.

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Humane Education for Children

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA The Richmond SPCA offers over 20,000 hours of humane education each year via tours/visits/birthday parties/summer camp and have plenty of kids on dog-training classes. We have certainly learned a lot about engaging this next generation of dog owners, inspiring compassion for animals in general, teaching the basics of reward-based training (kid timing is often far superior to adult timing) and promoting safety when meeting/greeting dogs. These are topics that ought to be taught repeatedly in every single community.
Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Dog's View of the World

Tim Lewis, Ph.D. Most dog enthusiasts know that canines must see the world differently from people, but lack more specifics. Because humans rely so heavily on vision, we tend to impose that lens on dogs. However, canine vision differs from humans, and their reliance on vision is less than ours. In this overview presentation, we will look at the biology of dog vision as well as hearing and smell. These senses really take place in the brain, so we will also explore what is known about canine brains and cognition. Each part will include links back to wolf biology and the context in which these senses developed over time, and the impacts these differences from us have on how a dog views our world.
Tim Lewis, Ph.D., is an eco-biologist, professor of biology at the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul Minn., and a widely-published research scientist. In addition, he is a popular lecturer on Canine Cognition at Camp Gone to the Dogs, VT and other venues nationwide. Tim has a longtime connection to the fields of human physiology and health, as well as the very different pedagogies involved in teaching activities courses such as the National Association of Underwater Instructors. He worked closely with Health and Human Performance (HHP) in the development of biology’s link to public health and provided stewardship to the HHP Department during its 2015 decennial review.

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The Real Deal: Arousal, Relaxation, Attention and Self-Modulation

Suzanne Clothier Handlers struggle with their dog’s unproductive arousal, lack of self-control, and lack of focus. Sometimes, the struggle is very physical as the handler tries to hang on to the dog using halters, harnesses and other devices. Relaxation is attempted at best in quiet moments here or there in “distraction free” areas, or through exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting for the client) protocols. A multitude of techniques and equipment exists to help handlers physically control their dogs, and to help dogs calm down, focus, relax. But frustrated handlers can feel that they are drowning in a plethora of options that may or may not be effective, even when they are diligent about doing the work. Worse still, they may have a dog who has many trained behaviors but is still challenging when not under specific cue or being kept on task, and who may still need special equipment. In part, the current dog training emphasis is on applied techniques which are sometimes applied without the necessary foundation that allows for learning and successful application. This presentation uses lecture, video and interactive exercises to present simple, effective techniques for helping handlers and dogs build the correct foundation for learning: • productive arousal (Think & Learn Zone) • relaxation (Really Real Relaxation) • self modulation (Auto Check-In, and Say Hi 1-2-3). These techniques are well grounded in behavioral, social and cognitive science, but are simple to learn and apply, even for the novice dog handler. Simple never equals simplistic. Simple choices are often at the heart of complex systems and profound results. Knowing how to help handler make simple choices can empower them to achieve the results they want in their relationship with their dogs. For the professional, this presentation emphasizes: • Authentic behavior vs. “faux” behavior o how is the authentic behavior expressed? o what are key elements of that behavior? o how to recognize artifacts or “noise” o creating the necessary conditions for the authentic behavior to occur • The power of intrinsic motivation & reinforcement o why intrinsic trumps extrinsic o rapid acquisition & strength of intrinsically driven behaviors o aligned vs. misaligned behaviors o creating intrinsic motivation • The value of social interaction, modeling and honest signaling o social interaction as the fabric of relationship o congruent communication o distinguishing a dog activity from a mutual activity • How simple yes/no decision points = complex achievements o “How is this for you?” o The Goldilocks Effect • Strengthening & improving the dog/human relationship in positive, humane ways Think & Learn Zone™ Does this advice sound familiar? “Begin in a quiet, distraction free environment.” While it sounds good on paper, in practice, this common advice turns out to have several drawbacks: 1. A quiet, distraction free environment has nothing to do with the dog’s own state of arousal. 2. Handlers are not taught to recognize, assess their dog’s arousal, and make appropriate yes/no decisions. 3. It sends a message to handlers that their dogs are not capable of learning when there is less than an ideal setting. 4. Both handler and dog can develop skills that are applicable only under ideal conditions. (“He does it at home in the kitchen!”) 5. Handlers are not empowered to make intelligent decisions about training vs. management in the real world. A different approach focuses on what the dog can tell us about his level of arousal and thus his ability to think and learn in any given moment. If the dog can think and learn in that setting, then it is an environment where training is possible, no matter how many distractions are present.
Suzanne Clothier has been working with animals professionally since 1977, she has a deep background of experience that includes obedience, agility, puppy testing, breeding, search and rescue, conformation, instructing, kennel management and canine midwifery. She has taught across the US and internationally for groups as varied as Wolf Park, FEMA-Northeast Region Disaster Dog Teams, Alaskan Dog Musher Association, and Assistance Dogs International. She has taught for training groups, rescues and shelters, veterinarians, breeders, national conferences, and search and rescue organizations. She served as a committee member for AKC Agility Advisory Board, American Humane Association Task Force for the Development of Humane Standards in Dog Training. She has served as a consultant to Guiding Eyes for the Blind, Southeastern Guide Dogs, Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation, Assistance Dogs of the West, and Guide Dogs of America. A German Shepherd breeder, eight generations of her Hawks Hunt German Shepherds have been successful in obedience, agility, SAR, tracking, nosework, herding, therapy work and as guide dog breeding stock. She lives on a working farm in upstate New York with husband, John Rice, and their considerable animal family of dogs, cats, parrots, tortoises, Scottish Highland cattle, horses, donkeys, pigs and chickens.

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Broadening Horizons: New Roles for Canine Professionals in Animal Assisted Interventions

Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC Interest in Animal Assisted Interventions (AAI) in many sectors has exploded in recent years, and dog trainers have increasingly offered therapy dog training classes for those interested in preparing their dogs for this type of work. Not all AAI programs have the same requirements for dogs, however, and expansions in the ways that dogs are included in therapy and visitation work mean new roles for canine professionals. This session highlights current trends in the broad field of AAI and the many needs of dog owners who wish to become involved. Traditional AAI programs are contrasted with innovative programs that require different personalities and different preparation of dogs. New roles for dog trainers to help meet the varied demands of this trend are covered, along with tips for working closely with therapists as they develop relationships and prepare their dogs for myriad roles. Drawing on her in-depth experience in training therapists and building AAI programs, Dr. VanFleet will discuss assessment tools, selection processes, training geared toward different roles, consultations with therapists about suitability of dogs or problems that crop up, teaching about canine communication signals, ethical and animal welfare considerations, and what dog trainers need to know about the different types of AAI now available. Forward-looking dog trainers will learn ways to offer new services and training options to clients who themselves are pushing the envelope in AAI.
Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC, is a licensed psychologist, registered play therapist-supervisor, and certified dog behavior consultant who directs both the Playful Pooch Program and the Family Enhancement & Play Therapy Center in Boiling Springs, Penn. She is also the founder of the International Institute for Animal Assisted Play Therapy™. She has over 40 years of experience working with children, parents, families, and groups in a variety of mental health and educational settings. Her work developing the field of Animal Assisted Play Therapy™ brought her more fully into the dog training/consultation world over 15 years ago, and she teaches mental health professionals about canine ethology, development, communication, and behavior/training for their AAPT work. She volunteers her training/behavior services at a local rescue, and provides in-home dog behavior consultations. She has a special interest in highly fearful, unsocialized, and traumatized dogs, and has pioneered the systematic use of play as part of their rehabilitation. She is the author of dozens of professional books, chapters, and articles about child/family therapy, play therapy, and dog training, the award-winning book Play Therapy with Kids & Canines, and the acclaimed Human Half of Dog Training: Collaborating with Clients to Get Results. She has received 12 national awards for her contributions to the field of psychology and her writing. Her latest book, Animal Assisted Play Therapy, will be published in 2017. Known for her warm, down-to-earth, lighthearted, and practical style, her past presentations at APDT and other conferences have been extremely well received. She is kept humble by her four dogs and three cats.

3:00 pm - 4:45 pm

Observations on the Socialization of Dogs

Sue Sternberg The current dog world promotes and supports a vague notion of 'Socialization' that encourages dog owners to have their dogs meet many strangers during their puppyhood and to play with other puppies in order to grow up friendly with other dogs. There are few specific details on how to do this, and even fewer adjustments for differing temperaments--from fearful to bold, sociable and non-sociable. What does playing with other puppies teach our puppies? Are some of the socializing techniques we promote outdated for the modern world--a world in which there are more dogs, more multiple dog households, more play between dogs and seemingly less between owner and dog, less access to nature, and what's seems to be a growing number of problematic temperaments? What do we do if we get our dogs at the age of five months (past the apparent critical socialization period)? Or at a year? Are there still training and socialization techniques that might help dogs? By showing video footage of some of the current practices I will show behaviors and offer observations of what I believe can be fallout from current practices, or owner-interpretation of vague recommendations. I will also show video footage of ways to escort dogs through the universe and 'socialize' them in such a way as to thwart the trend of owners letting their leashed and unleashed dogs descend upon any dog they encounter. I wish to challenge some of the current socialization recommendations and offer ways of encouraging new puppy owners and new owners of dogs of all ages to raise dogs that find their owners most important and fun, are confident enough to navigate society, feel safe in their environments, find a purpose/work, and are hopefully able to cope with whatever the world throws at them.
Sue Sternberg has over 35 years of dog behavior experience, including as a dog control officer, kennel and animal care technician at various shelters, dog trainer, behavior counselor, instructor, temperament evaluator, boarding kennel owner, veterinary assistant, is a successful competitor in a variety of dog sports, and a teacher of dog trainers. In 1993 she started her own shelter in upstate New York and has created national shelter programs to improve the lives of shelter dogs. Sue has two main goals in life: to make the shelter dog world a better place and to make public dog parks safer and more fun for dogs who must use them. To do this, Sue travels and educates people on canine communication, body language and behavior. She is the author of Successful Dog Adoption (Howell Book House) and numerous other books--most recently How Old is This Dog? They can all be found at Dogwise.com. Sue has produced many DVDs on dog behavior and aggression, and also has an iPhone app, The Dog Park Assistant, which is a video repository of dog play and aggressive behaviors, to ensure that when dogs get together they are truly having fun and not going to hurt each other. Sue has two wonderful, adopted heeler mixes. Sue is also an accomplished fiddle player, an amateur paleontologist, loves Earl Grey tea, and is a major Star Trek fan.

3:00 pm - 4:45 pm

Fear Free Veterinary Care - What Dog Trainers Need to Know

Ellen Lindell, VMD, DACVB What is the Fear Free℠initiative? There was a time when pet professionals focused more on the destination than the journey. We had an end point in mind and worked efficiently to accomplish that end point, without much regard to the emotional well-being of the pet or the pet’s person. The Fear Free℠ initiative began as veterinary health care teams recognized that many pets and clients alike experienced distress when they visited the animal hospital. While dogs drag their owners into the pet food store hoping for treats and toys, these very same dogs only enter the veterinary hospital if they are coaxed and cajoled. In the examination room, many pets used to struggle while teams of assistants tried to hold them down. It could be difficult to get an accurate assessment of temperature or heart rate in these distressed animals. The Fear Free℠initiative offers a fresh new way of delivering veterinary care. With the help of an Advisory Panel of many animal experts, guidelines have been created to facilitate a calm veterinary experience. These guidelines consider ways to manage the physical environment as well as the social environment. Fear Free℠ concepts can be applied to the stress associated with all aspects of a veterinary visit. From the car ride to the waiting area. From the exam room to the hospital ward. And even after a patient returns home, he may experience stress associated with special care or exercise restrictions needed during the recovery period. With a little guidance, we can change our behavior and use a quiet approach. We’ll discuss behavior modification to give their patients the skills to relax and accept handling, veterinarians and pet owners need the help of behaviorists and trainers. During our session, we will discuss some of the important skills needed for a general examination as well as for management of some common illnesses or procedures. We will talk about ways to develop a customized DSCC protocol that meets the need of an individual. Network with veterinary health care teams – they may not know that you are available to help. Integrating the behavioral needs of pets with their medical needs is a win-win approach. Let’s discuss some opportunities in your area!
Dr. Lindell attended and graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Penn. She then received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. After practicing general medicine and surgery for several years, Dr. Lindell began a residency program in veterinary behavior at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. She successfully fulfilled the requirements for board-certification and is now a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. Dr. Lindell is an active member and President-Elect of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. She is also an active Board member of the Westchester Rockland Veterinary Medical Association. Though most of her time is spent practicing behavioral medicine, Dr. Lindell loves to teach. She serves as a behavior consultant on VIN (Veterinary Information Network) and frequently lectures to veterinarians at both regional and national conferences. Dr. Lindell has been an invited speaker at meetings of paraprofessionals, breeders, and pet owners. In between practicing and lecturing, Dr. Lindell enjoys writing about behavior. For many years, she wrote a popular Q & A column in the Cornell University publication, Catwatch. She has written chapters for several veterinary textbooks as well as public interest books. When there is time to spare, Dr. Lindell and her dogs participate in dog related sports including agility and obedience. Her non-pet passion: classical piano.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts


9:00 am - 11:00 am

Drones, Social Media and More: Using Technology in Your Practice

Bill Dotson Join Bill as he walks you through a day in the life of a training client and a trainer to learn how technology allows both people to have a great experience. He’ll describe the expectations buyers have in 2017 and how you can meet and exceed them using technology tools such as email marketing, social media, video education, automated reviews, and more. This session uses the story of a client and trainer to highlight how technology can touch every part of your business. As the session proceeds, you’ll learn new ways to think about technology, reputable tools to use, what activities you should and should not spend time on, and approximate costs to make it all happen. Bill wraps up the session with marketing ideas empowered by tech tools. Don’t miss this if you want to grow your practice and amaze your clients.
Bill Dotson is a speaker, technology consultant, and entrepreneur who has over 20 years of experience helping others understand and use the Internet to reach their goals. Bill speaks to thousands of people each year about the best technology to use to solve problems and achieve their goals. He is a father of three, a Lexington, Ky., native, and believes in lifelong learning for everyone.

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Lights, Camera, Action! Creating Superstars is Your Business

Toni Mark, M.A., KPA-CTP and Michelle Mullins, CPDT-KA, KPA-CTP Working on photo and video shoots can be stressful situations especially for animals and their owners. Michelle and Toni are passionate the animals and their pet parents have an amazing experience on set even if they have little to no experience. After several years and many shoots later, they have learned the tricks of the trade to ensuring the animal remains comfortable and happy so the photographer or videographer can get the perfect shot. Join Michelle and Toni as they address how, as trainers, you can do the same and incorporate your skills as services for local companies, family portraits, wedding services and other outlets.
Goals will be to:
-Understand the trainer’s role in a photo/video shoot and how to work cohesively with the team to maximize the opportunity of getting the shot while being the best advocate for the animal.
-Identify potential career opportunities by including this expertise as an additional service for clients.
-Understand ways to make the animal the most comfortable in a potentially stressful short-term situation.
Michelle Mullins and Toni Mark make up the Training & Behavior Education Department for Radio Systems Corporation PetSafe® brand. Michelle is is a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer and TAGTeach Primary Level Certified. Toni is a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner and has a Masters degree in Communication. She has also completed the Karen Pryor Academy Shelter Training and Enrichment Program One of their responsibilities is to handle animals at the photo and video shoots for the PetSafe brand. This duty requires they have the dog or cat in the correct position for the right shot, but more importantly, ensure that the dog or cat remain comfortable, relaxed and happy during the entire shoot. This process also includes creating a cooperative and comfortable environment between the pet owner, photographer and trainer to ensure the animal is in a non-stressful environment and is handled with the utmost care. After several years and many photo shoots for a large corporation, they have learned the tricks to the trade to take an average pet and make him a superstar!

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Managing Your Most Expensive Asset - People

Eric Kenoyer During this session Eric will explore different strategies, processes and tips for managing employees. Using the employment life cycle model, he will walk through all the phases we experience with our employees, from sourcing to terminations. This is an interactive session and great opportunity to learn from others.
Throughout his career, Eric has provided strategic Human Resources direction, management and leadership to companies in the professional services, manufacturing, and association management arenas. He is skilled in driving business outcomes through the development and execution of strategic HR policies, practices, and programs. During his 18 year career he has demonstrated his ability to drive organizational change by aligning an organization’s intellectual capital with its strategic plan and goals. His specializations include organizational planning and development, recruitment and selection, employment law, employee benefits, and employee relations/coaching. Eric graduated from Eastern Kentucky University with a bachelor’s of business administration.

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Furry Funding: Grant and Fundraising Basics

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA Looking for funding does not have to be an overwhelming task for staff and volunteers. But funding is very necessary to achieving your mission. Let’s take some frustrations out of the process and make a solid plan. In this session learn basics of fundraising principles and grant development as well as funding research methods. We will dive in to a variety of funding mechanisms as well as what makes a grant application successful to address your needs.
Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, is the Executive Director of Accounting & Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA. Born with an entreprenurial drive and passion for service, Ericka has over 15 years of professional experience in the nonprofit and business sectors. A business owner since sixth grade, she quickly grew her career in fundraising, grants, and nonprofit management. Ericka is responsible for raising $14 million in funds, service as a federal grant review chair, providing consulting services to nonprofits, co-founding a social enterprise catering company, and teaching communication and fundraising at the university level. To gain a broad foundation to build on, she pursued higher education in marketing and communication, earning a masters and bachelors in Communication, a bachelor's in marketing and is a Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Leadership concentrating on Nonprofit Leadership from Eastern University in St. David's, Penn. She currently serves on the board of directors for Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, Professional Women's Forum and God's Closet, Inc.

2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

What Size World is Right for This Dog?

Suzanne Clothier Past the simple notion of thresholds, dogs exist in a complex web of relationships and environment, expectations and abilities. As a species, dogs can find themselves at odds with or pressured by life with humans. As an individual, each dog is unique in his capacity for adapting to life with humans, in sensory processing and sensitivities, and in the nuances of temperament and personality. The individual dog’s abilities, skills and needs are brought together with the expectations, skills, needs and understanding of the handler. Each handler varies in their understanding of dogs as a species, dogs as specific breeds or types, and of each dog as an individual. While love is a good thing, it is not enough to assure that the handler will act in ways that are supportive or fair to the dog. The dog and handler live together within specific conditions which may or may not support the dog or the relationship. This shared life can be a beautiful meshing of abilities and needs, or it can be a frustrating, disappointing and difficult mismatch. One common question that arises from this complex interaction of dog, handler and environment is: “How do I know what is too much, or not enough?” Handlers want to do right by their dog, providing them with a “happy life.” But what constitutes a happy life? What is enough? What is too much? What is not enough? What size world is right for this dog? We are always seeking the Goldilocks Effect: We want it to be just right. But even professionals can struggle to find that “just right” balance for any specific dog. It can be challenging to know what technique or equipment or methodology are right for an individual dog. Trainers are often puzzled by why an approach that is – in theory – appropriate is just not having the desired results, particularly if it has been helpful with other dogs. Are they applying it incorrectly? too soon? too often? not frequently enough? Should they keep working at it for another session or week or month? Training techniques and equipment are effective only under specific conditions. The question is which specific conditions are necessary for success? Very often, the answer hinges completely on the dog himself. Trainers are also frequently faced with the challenge of handlers who have expectations or needs that are not aligned with a dog’s abilities, temperament or skills. For the ethical, humane trainer, the question becomes a tricky one: “How can the dog be protected and supported while still allowing for improvement and development of new skills?” For some dogs, there is a limit past which they simply cannot go, regardless of how positive, humane or well intended the training. Knowing how to recognize that limit is critical. How far can this dog go?” Handlers and trainers both ask this, hoping that there is a crystal ball answer somewhere. None of us have crystal balls, but we can learn to utilize nuanced assessment tools for understanding the individual dog and making informed decisions in the dog’s best interests. This presentation offers trainers a number of ways to ask the dog himself: “What size world is right for you?” It turns out that the dog himself can provide the answers, if we know what to look for, and how to place it in the proper context. Emphasis is on using video, a variety of assessment tools and interactive exercises to help attendees understand what a dog’s behavior can tell us about: • Arousal & resilience o Intensity of arousal and its effects on learning o Importance of resolution • Temperament & personality o “Who are you?” o Personality = temperament + experience o What’s mutable? • Skills & training o What skills does dog have? o What skills need to be developed? o Skills & training vs. abilities • Handler/dog dynamics o Realistic assessment vs. hopes & dreams o Providing context and scale • Monitoring progress o “How is this for you?” o What size world? o Testing the fit The assessment tools I have developed will be demonstrated: • RAT
For some dogs, there is a limit past which they simply cannot go, regardless of how positive, humane or well-intended the training. Knowing how to recognize that limit is critical. How far can this dog go?” Handlers and trainers both ask this, hoping that there is a crystal ball answer somewhere. None of us have crystal balls, but we can learn to utilize nuanced assessment tools for understanding the individual dog and making informed decisions in the dog’s best interests. This presentation offers trainers ways to ask the dog himself: “What size world is right for you?” It turns out that the dog himself can provide the answers, if we know what to look for, and how to place it in the proper context. Emphasis is on using video, a variety of assessment tools and interactive exercises to help attendees understand what a dog’s behavior can tell us about: arousal and resilience - Intensity of arousal and its effects on learning o Importance of resolution; temperament and personality - “Who are you?”- Personality = temperament + experience - What’s mutable?; skills & training - What skills does dog have? - What skills need to be developed? - Skills & training vs. abilities; handler/dog dynamics - Realistic assessment vs. hopes and dreams - Providing context and scale; Monitoring progress - “How is this for you?” - What size world? - Testing the fit.

2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

Empathy, Teaching, & Boundary-Setting: Finding the Right Mix with Human Clients

Risë VanFleet Working with human clients to train their dogs is highly complex work, often because of the human factors involved. Canine professionals need to listen and understand, teach new skills, and manage the interactions so that the dogs benefit. Sometimes trainers find themselves in roles resembling marital therapists, child minders, and divorce court judges. At other times, they are frustrated by lack of follow-through, unrealistic expectations, and wondering if their teaching is having any impact at all. This presentation highlights three key components of the training and consultation process, with an emphasis on the need for balance among them. The session includes ways to keep training on track despite the many things that can go wrong. It also covers ways to set boundaries tactfully and to use understanding of clients' needs to help build better follow-through. The interplay and prioritization of empathy, teaching, and boundaries will be highlighted by challenging case examples and activities.
Risë VanFleet, Ph.D., RPT-S, CDBC, is a licensed psychologist, registered play therapist-supervisor, and certified dog behavior consultant who directs both the Playful Pooch Program and the Family Enhancement & Play Therapy Center in Boiling Springs, PA. She is also the founder of the International Institute for Animal Assisted Play Therapy™. She has over 40 years of experience working with children, parents, families, and groups in a variety of mental health and educational settings. Her work developing the field of Animal Assisted Play Therapy™ brought her more fully into the dog training/consultation world over 15 years ago, and she teaches mental health professionals about canine ethology, development, communication, and behavior/training for their AAPT work. She volunteers her training/behavior services at a local rescue, and provides in-home dog behavior consultations. She has a special interest in highly fearful, unsocialized, and traumatized dogs, and has pioneered the systematic use of play as part of their rehabilitation. She is the author of dozens of professional books, chapters, and articles about child/family therapy, play therapy, and dog training, the award-winning book Play Therapy with Kids & Canines, and the acclaimed Human Half of Dog Training: Collaborating with Clients to Get Results. She has received 12 national awards for her contributions to the field of psychology and her writing. Her latest book, Animal Assisted Play Therapy, will be published in 2017. Known for her warm, down-to-earth, lighthearted, and practical style, her past presentations at APDT and other conferences have been extremely well received. She is kept humble by her four dogs and three cats.

2:45 pm - 4:45 pm

The ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center: A Second Chance for Fearful Dogs

Kristin Collins, M.S., ACAAB, Senior Director, Anti-Cruelty Behavior Rehabilitation This talk will introduce the ASPCA’s groundbreaking work at our Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, a facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and study of fearful, under-socialized dogs. Attendees will learn about problematic behaviors commonly seen in canine victims of cruelty and neglect, behavior modification and enrichment strategies designed to reduce fear and improve adoptability, our research design and goals, and some of our early discoveries. The workshop will include video footage and time for Q&A. Intended audience: animal behavior experts and animal welfare professionals and volunteers who evaluate, rehabilitate, place and/or provide care for fearful dogs.
Kristen Collins, Senior Director of Anti-Cruelty Behavior Rehabilitation, oversees the operation of the ASPCA’s Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, a facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and study of fearful, under-socialized dogs. Her previous work includes conducting behavior evaluations to determine the best outcome for animals rescued from dog fighting, puppy mill and hoarding situations, designing and implementing shelter behavior modification and enrichment programs, conducting animal behavior research, writing and editing articles on animal behavior, and speaking on animal behavior topics at professional and academic conferences. Kristen is an Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and holds a master’s degree in applied animal behavior from the University of Illinois.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts


9:00 am - 11:00 am

Understanding and Applying the LIMA (Least Intrusive, Minimally Aversive) Approach

Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D. The LIMA (Least Intrusive Minimally Aversive) approach provides both a standard and guidelines for working with dogs as effectively and humanely as possible. Understanding LIMA and applying it effectively will improve your effectiveness as a trainer and/or behaviorist. This talk will discuss the purpose and principles behind LIMA as well as the components of LIMA and its suggested hierarchy of behavior change. We will also discuss research examining the effectiveness and behavioral impacts of different training methodologies. Finally, the talk includes a review of basic principles of learning as needed to fully understand an in-depth discussion of LIMA.
Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., owns Smart Dog Training and Behavior, LLC. She specializes in the prevention and treatment of behavior problems in dogs. Kristina has a Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience/Biopsychology. She studies the social cognition, evolution and behavior of dogs. Since 2010, Kristina has taught 14 undergraduate courses including Learning, Evolutionary Psychology, Statistics and Introduction to Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience. In 2012, she earned the Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student Award. She has also served as an invited presenter at several teaching workshops and presentations hosted by the University and was an invited speaker at the Evolutionary Studies Summit at SUNY New Paltz in 2012. She is also on the APDT’s education committee. Prior to opening Smart Dog in 2001, Kristina obtained her B.S. in Wildlife Ecology at the University at Wisconsin and served as an assistant trainer at Dog’s Best Friend, then owned by Dr. Patricia McConnell.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Branding Yourself

Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA Whether you are a small business owner or a member of a big team, your personal brand contributes to the success of any organization you are affiliated. Your brand may be the difference between you and a competitor. Don’t be overwhelmed! Attend this session to find out more about steps to branding, managing your online presence, and tools to really make you shine!
Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, is the Executive Director of Accounting & Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA. Born with an entreprenurial drive and passion for service, Ericka has over 15 years of professional experience in the nonprofit and business sectors. A business owner since sixth grade, she quickly grew her career in fundraising, grants, and nonprofit management. Ericka is responsible for raising $14 million in funds, service as a federal grant review chair, providing consulting services to nonprofits, co-founding a social enterprise catering company, and teaching communication and fundraising at the university level. To gain a broad foundation to build on, she pursued higher education in marketing and communication, earning a masters and bachelors in Communication, a bachelor's in marketing and is a Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Leadership concentrating on Nonprofit Leadership from Eastern University in St. David's, Penn. She currently serves on the board of directors for Girl Scouts of Kentucky's Wilderness Road Council, Professional Women's Forum and God's Closet, Inc.

12:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Citizen Scientist --Studying Sociability in Dogs

Dr. Tim Lewis and Sue Sternberg Dr. Tim Lewis and Sue Sternberg have been immersing dog trainers and shelter personnel into how the tools of science can make them better at understanding dogs. Their Canine Sociability Initiative includes a real-world project looking at the two-minute sociability test from Assess-A-Pet and its relationship with a new, ten-second sociability snapshot test that can be done while the dog is in his kennel. The project brings trainers and shelter personnel into the world of science by taking them step by step through the process of developing a hypothesis, designing an experiment, creating a scoring system, and collecting data. The results of this work are helping to quickly identify dogs at either extreme of sociability. Tim and Sue have been traveling and doing workshops in which participants are part of the process and seeing the data come forth in real time. Through extensive video footage of full sociability tests and the snapshots, participants can fully realize the process by experiencing every part of the research. During the workshop, we learn more about body language and behaviors by watching detailed video footage of shelter dogs, finding a scoring system that quantifies and qualifies the discrete behaviors identified in sociable dogs, non-sociable, and also aggressive dogs. The project hopes to find a quick, safe, simple-to-score (even by non-dog professionals), and scientifically-validated method of assessing the behavior of shelter dogs to identify the most sociable and most non-sociable with the potential for aggression. The snapshot test is not intended to replace a full assessment, but instead provides a way for shelters that currently do not assess because they perceive a lack of time or expertise, to be able to at least perform this new test. Practical uses include rural shelters with more dogs than adopters to use as a selection process for deciding which dogs to send on transports and is useful for anyone needing a quick assessment of dog sociability.

1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

The Behavioral Economics of Your Dog's Behavior: Preference, Reinforcement, and Training

Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA The effectiveness of reinforcers is essential to training. So, how do we assess how effective a reinforcer is? A common way is assessing preference for an item or an interaction as a reinforcer. We will evaluate recent studies looking at dogs’ preferences for different human interactions--a study from 2016 suggested dogs prefer praise as much as food, but there's ample evidence to the contrary and we will discuss! Additionally, preference doesn’t give us the whole picture; preference for something doesn’t always mean it will be an effective reinforcer. To look at how preference and reinforcer effectiveness interact, we will use behavioral economics, which deals with how much behavior a reinforcer can maintain. We will delve into this field and discuss the effect of unit price, delay, elasticity of commodities (reinforcers), as well as what it means to have substitutable or complementary reinforcers. We will discuss how we can apply these topics to improve our dog training, as well as better understand our own behavior. Throughout, we will look at data from humans, traditional lab animals, and, of course, dogs!
Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA, is an Assistant Professor of Anthrozoology at Carroll College in Helena, MT. There she is the canine specialist, leading the program in which students train and foster dogs during the academic year. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Florida under Dr. Clive Wynne in the UF Canine Cognition and Behavior Lab and her Masters in Behavior Analysis under Dr. Jesus Rosales-Ruiz. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, has attended the SF SPCA Dog Trainer Academy, and has worked as a shelter behaviorist. She has published a variety of scientific articles on her research on learning theory and the dog-human relationship. She has taught Principles of Behavior Analysis, Learning and Cognition, Basic and Advanced Canine Training, and Research Methods. She has earned awards for her behavior analytic research on dog behavior. Her research interests center on dog-human social interactions, improving shelter dog welfare, and assessing training techniques.

1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

Beware! Aggression in Dogs

Pat Miller The vast majority of the time when the human is committed to implementing the management and modification protocols presented, their dogs are successful at learning how to live in their world without resorting to aggression. This session is intended to give the attendee a better understanding of canine aggression, what it is, and what causes it, along with a review of science-based, force-free protocols for successful management and modification of aggression.
Pat Miller has been training dogs for more than 35 years. As a child, Pat was the one who taught the family dog to sit, lie down, and jump over broomsticks in the living room. Her professional life has always involved animals, first as a horse trainer in Wisconsin, then for 20 years as a humane officer at the Marin Humane society in California, and most recently as a certified professional dog trainer and behavior consultant. She launched her own dog training company on the West Coast in 1996, after five years assisting nationally acclaimed obedience instructor Judie Howard of Arydith Obedience, and relocated the Peaceable Paws Dog and Puppy Training Center to Chattanooga, Tenn., in the year 2000, then to its present 80-acre campus in Fairplay, Md., in April of 2004. Pat received her CPDT-KA certification as a professional dog trainer from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers in September of 2001, one of the first 136 trainers in the world to attain this title. Pat is also a freelance writer and author, regularly contributing articles on dog behavior and training to The Whole Dog Journal, Your Dog (a publication of Tufts University's Veterinary School), and several other publications. She is also Training Editor for The Whole Dog Journal. Her first dog training book, The Power of Positive Dog Training was released by Howell Book House in August of 2001 and has been on Amazon.com’s "Top 10 Dog Training Books" list since January of 2002. Her other books are: Positive Perspectives, Positive Perspectives 2, and Play With Your Dog. A "cross-over" trainer, Pat started her long dog-training career using "old-fashioned" methods that relied on the use of force-based tools and methods – jerks on the choke chain, harsh verbal corrections – and successfully earned numerous obedience titles with a variety of dogs, including a Rough Collie, a Bull Terrier, an Australian Kelpie, a Pomeranian, and Josie, her wonderful Terrier mix. It was Josie who convinced her to cross over to force-free methods, and she is now fully committed to science-based, positive reinforcement training. Pat shares her Fairplay home with husband Paul, and their five dogs (Missy, Dubhy, Lucy, Scooter and Bonnie); three cats (Barney, Viva and Blue); five horses (Molly, Rafiki, Levi, Mikey and Olivia); one donkey (Joan); and one pot-bellied pig (Sturgis). They also operate Peaceable Pastures, a horse-friendly boarding facility.

1:45 pm - 3:45 pm

How to Be a Diplomat - Making Peace Among Cats and Dogs

Steve Dale, CABC A quarter of pet homes have at least one dog and one cat. What do clients do when they’re fighting like cats and dogs? Integrating a dog in a home filled with felines, or introducing a cat into a house with a dog, a step-by-step description and tools to set up clients for success. Also discussed will be common inter-species behavior issues, such as dogs who like snacking from the litter box or scarfing down the cat’s food, to cats who run outside the door when it’s opened for dogs to take a walk.
Steve Dale, CABC (certified animal behavior consultant) is host of two national radio shows (Black Dog Radio Productions), Steve Dale’s Pet World, The Pet Minute) and Steve Dale’s Pet World on WGN Radio, Chicago. For 21 year years he authored a Tribune syndicated national newspaper column. His blog is at www.stevedale.tv. His many TV appearances range from Oprah to National Geographic Explorer to a wide variety of Animal Planet programs, and as a former contributor to superstation WGN. He’s currently a regular on nationally syndicated “HouseSmarts TV.” Among his books, are two ebooks “Good Dog!” and “Good Cat!” He’s a co-editor of “Decoding Your Dog” (authored by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists). He’s a contributor to “The Cat: Clinical Medicine and Management” (edited Dr. Susan Little), “Treatment and Care of the Geriatric Veterinary Patient” (edited Dr. Mary Gardner and Dr. Dani McVety, 2017), and others. He has written forewords and introductions to many books. Steve’s a columnist at Veterinary Practice News, and CATster. Formerly he was the pet editor at USA Weekend. He speaks at veterinary and animal welfare conferences around the world. Steve’s earned multiple awards for his work including the AVMA Humane Award, and is the youngest person inducted into the Dog Writer’s Hall of Fame. Steve serves on the Boards of the Winn Feline Foundation American Association of Human-Animal Bond Veterinarians. He’s a past Board Member of the American Humane Association, and he’s a founder and past Board member of the CATalyst Council. He’s also scientific advisor at Pet Partners. And he’s on the Advisory Board of SPCA Puerto Vallarta, and others.

8:00 am - 8:45 am

Shorts


9:00 am - 11:00 am

Dominance: Myth or Fact? A Detailed Look at What the Science Says

Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D. This talk will focus on the subject of dominance and dominance hierarchies from an ethological perspective. We will first discuss the definition of dominance in the scientific literature and the function of dominance hierarchies in social species. Then we'll take a detailed look at the research on dominance in wolves and domestic dogs and the discussions taking place in the scientific literature. Move away from the rhetoric and focus on the facts to enhance your understanding of dog behavior and your training and behavior modification methodologies
Kristina Spaulding, Ph.D., owns Smart Dog Training and Behavior, LLC. She specializes in the prevention and treatment of behavior problems in dogs. Kristina has a PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience/Biopsychology. She studies the social cognition, evolution and behavior of dogs. Since 2010, Kristina has taught 14 undergraduate courses including Learning, Evolutionary Psychology, Statistics and Introduction to Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience. In 2012, she earned the Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student Award. She has also served as an invited presenter at several teaching workshops and presentations hosted by the University and was an invited speaker at the Evolutionary Studies Summit at SUNY New Paltz in 2012. She is also on the APDT’s education committee. Prior to opening Smart Dog in 2001, Kristina obtained her B.S. in Wildlife Ecology at the University at Wisconsin and served as an assistant trainer at Dog’s Best Friend, then owned by Dr. Patricia McConnell.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

The Power of Single-subject Research Designs to Enhance Training Practices to Research

Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D., CPDT-KA, BCBA-D The world of dog training is full of interesting but unanswered questions. It is also full of dedicated, passionate, and scientifically-minded practitioners who constitute an enormous source of manpower to help answer these questions. Certain behavioral research designs from the field of behavior analysis are uniquely suited to answering training and behavior questions, and to being used by committed practitioners, thereby contributing to our scientific field and our applied field of training. These research designs are called small n, or single-subject designs and are experimentally powerful designs, although they are often misinterpreted by lay audiences who have been taught to look mainly at the sample size as a guide for research quality. In this workshop, we will guide attendees through the steps of designing a research study, and, will detail the various single subject designs and why they are more powerful than group designs. We will use our own research into dog behavior, learning, and welfare to demonstrate these designs. We will discuss why they are particularly well-suited to animal trainers who wish to contribute scientifically to their field. We will discuss each design’s advantages and disadvantages, and what questions each is best suited for, and how to mix-and-match these designs to make the strongest experimental design for your question. We will discuss and practice how to systematically observe and measure behavior, as well as which measures are best suited for different types of behavior. We will then delve into how to interpret results from your research, and how to make data-based decision in terms of where to go next with your research as well as with your clients. Attendees will practice working through designing experiments using research ideas provided to them. However, one goal of the workshop is for attendees to leave with a research project they could implement. We will ask attendees to bring research ideas that they can develop and get feedback on during the workshop. Using their own research questions to design a study. We will give personal feedback to the attendees to design an experiment for their question, including operational definitions for the behavior, how to measure the behavior, how to ensure and measure treatment integrity, and how to interpret their results. While the workshop is geared for those interested in contributing scientifically, the same experimental designs, controls, and behavioral measures are used to make data-based training decisions. Thus, the workshop is appropriate for all trainers who want to ensure that their intervention is having the desired outcome, and to enhance trainer’s ability to make effective training decisions based on accurate measures of behavior change—that is, to train scientifically.
Erica Feuerbacher, M.S., Ph.D., BCBA-D, CPDT-KA is an Assistant Professor of Anthrozoology at Carroll College in Helena, MT. There she is the canine specialist, leading the program in which students train and foster dogs during the academic year. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Florida under Dr. Clive Wynne in the UF Canine Cognition and Behavior Lab and her Masters in Behavior Analysis under Dr. Jesus Rosales-Ruiz. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, has attended the SF SPCA Dog Trainer Academy, and has worked as a shelter behaviorist. She has published a variety of scientific articles on her research on learning theory and the dog-human relationship. She has taught Principles of Behavior Analysis, Learning and Cognition, Basic and Advanced Canine Training, and Research Methods. She has earned awards for her behavior analytic research on dog behavior. Her research interests center on dog-human social interactions, improving shelter dog welfare, and assessing training techniques.

9:00 am - 11:00 am

Natural Methods to Positive Behavior

Meg Harrison Want positive, permanent results? Here are natural solutions to difficult and/or chronic behavior problems. Blends of flower essences, therapeutic-grade essential oils and homeopathic remedies have been "field tested" for 40 years on 1,000's in training, in shelter settings, plus before, during, and after natural disasters.
Meg Harrison, flower essence expert specializing in animal behavior, has successfully helped thousands of behaviorally-challenged animals using unique blends of essences, essential oils, and/or homeopathic remedies. Working with trainers, health care practitioners, rescuers, fosters, clinics, and shelters nationwide, she facilitates positive change in the vast majority of cases, no matter how difficult or emotionally damaged. Her bio includes experience with 14 California wildfires, hands-on work in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and during Hurricane Rita, 2 F-5 Texas tornadoes, rehabilitating rescues from puppy mills, hoarding cases, court ordered seizures, research labs, captured Mustangs, dogs, feral and community cats, plus farm animals rescued from slaughter and re-homed quickly adjusting to their new environments thus the outstanding success in shelter settings. For 40 years, she has advocated for gentler, more effective ways to improve overall well-being and behavioral health of 24 species including humans sharing her experiences and hard-won knowledge with anyone who would listen whether in a lecture hall, walking shelter dogs, or during a natural disaster.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Writing and Publishing Books About Dogs and Dog Training

Pat McConnell, Ph.D., CAAB Have you ever wondered how authors find time to write? How to select the best publisher for your book? Or just wondered about what it's really like to publish and promote a book on a national level? Join Patricia for a talk on the ins and outs of the publishing world, from small booklets to best sellers.
Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., CAAB, is an ethologist who has consulted for over twenty years about serious behavioral problems in dogs. She taught, "The Biology and Philosophy of Human/Animal Relationships," in the Department of Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for twenty five-years and speaks around the world about canine behavior and training. Dr. McConnell is the author of eleven books on training and behavioral problems, as well as the critically acclaimed books The Other End of the Leash (translated into 14 languages), For the Love of a Dog, and Tales of Two Species. Her newest book, The Education of Will, is a memoir focusing on healing from trauma in both people and dogs. Patricia and her husband live with their working Border Collies, Willie and Maggie, her King Charles Cavalier Spaniel, and Tootsie, along with a very spoiled flock of sheep. For more information, go to www.patriciamcconnell.com or visit her blog at www.theotherendoftheleash.com.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Socialize Your Dog Training Business with Content Marketing on Social Media

Trevor Smith. CPDT-KA The marketing game has a new name and it is called social media. Now is the time to capture the people around you through getting over you fears and finally taking the next step to socialize your dog training business. In a sea of content that is being pushed to these platforms on a daily basis, it can be difficult to stand out. With the use of video, you can diversify your dog training business from the crowd. Now that platforms have provided the ability to shoot live video, expanding your reach has never been easier. Though social media can be a bit overwhelming, there are some simple steps that you can make to create quality content for people in your community.
Trevor started training dogs at the age of six. At the age of sixteen, he began instructing his own private lessons and classes. With over twenty years of experience in training dogs, his passion is to use his experiences over the years to help people grow closer to their canine companions. In 2015, he launched a dog training educational platform called Doggie Dojo to help people discover the path to life with their dog. Through the use of both produced and live video marketing he has expanded his reach through Social media. In May of last year he was asked to join a team of broadcasters on The Pet Scope TV to do a show called Tricked Out with Doggie Dojo. In being a regular broadcaster for this online network, he was asked this last fall to be a live broadcaster from one of the largest, 36,000 members, dog training Facebook groups. On Modern Dog Training and Behavior Advice, he gives training tips on his show called The Doggie Dojo show.

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

So You Want to be an Advocate? Finding and Changing Animal Laws in Your Community

Debra Griggs, president, VA Federation of Humane Societies; Sue Bell, executive director of Homeward Trails Animal Rescue; Matthew Gray, Virginia State Director for The Humane Society of the United States; Heidi Meinzer, JD, CPDT-KSA, CNWI, APDT board member (moderator) Animal welfare is a bipartisan topic that has recently taken a high priority in local, state and federal legislation. There have been an explosion of proposed legislation and laws touching on our companion animals, on issues as broad as breed discriminatory laws, damages for injury or death of a dog or cat, animal shelter regulation, and pet shops and puppy mills. Your legislators need to hear from you as stakeholders and constituents with interest and experience in dog training and behavior. Finding the laws that impact you and your companion animals – and the legislators who have the biggest influence – can be daunting. Also, the process of changing those laws can be confusing and intimidating. This presentation will give you guidance about where to find relevant federal, state and local laws, as well as how to identify key legislators. We will also empower you with the confidence to approach legislators to improve animal related laws. We’ll give you a road map, along with real world examples of how Virginia animal advocates have united through the Virginia Federation of Humane Societies and the HSUS to bring about positive change for animals.
Debra Griggs is the president of the Virginia Federation of Humane Societies. She founded Animal Resources of Tidewater, and was the founding chair of the Animal Welfare Coalition of Hampton Roads. Previously she was president of the Junior League of Norfolk-Virginia Beach, chair of the Ryan White Care Consortium, chair of the Women’s Multicultural Coalition and served on the board of the Hampton Roads REALTORS Association. Her volunteerism was recognized when she received the 2010 Converse College Alumni Community Service Award. Debra is a committed advocate for the under-served and has a personal passion for ending discrimination – whether it is based upon gender, race, ethnicity, or those marginalized by circumstance as in the case of homelessness and AIDS. In her current role as an animal welfare advocate, she is a leader in the effort to end dog breed discrimination. Debra is the managing broker of RE/MAX Ambassadors in Norfolk and shares her home in Norfolk with husband, Steve, a retired engineer and their beloved dogs, Cotton, Marley, Chewie and Ralph. Sue Bell is the executive director of Homeward Trails Animal Rescue, Inc. (Homeward Trails), a private shelter in Northern Virginia that has placed over 20,000 dogs and cats since its inception in 2001. Sue serves on the VFHS Board, and has consulted with many Virginia lawmakers, localities and advocates to help implement animal friendly laws. Matthew Gray is the Virginia State Director for The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Matt is a Richmond, Va., native who brings extensive grassroots organizing, fundraising and political experience to his role, having served previously as the executive director of the Virginia Public Safety Foundation.

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Enrichment in Richmond

Sarah Babcock, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA We care for an average of 100 dogs and 150 cats at the Richmond SPCA and keeping them safe and sane while they are in our care in job #1. Medical care is critical --- and behavior modification is often required, but much of what we do is daily kennel enrichment. In this presentation, we'll examine some of our best-of-breed programs (Running Buddies, FOCUS list, quiet time, play groups, Animal Brigade, etc), highlight best-of-breed programs at other shelters, and look at enrichment plans that would work for individual pets living in a home.
Sarah grew up in Southern California and started training the family dogs at a very young age. She turned her attention to horses and rode and competed hunters throughout high school and college. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Sweet Briar College with a BA in Math/Economics and almost immediately went to work for IBM. During her 14 years at IBM, Sarah worked as a systems engineer, as one of the first PC sales “fighter pilots,” as a local area network and software specialist, and in database/data warehousing marketing. In March 1996, she found a dog on the street in front of her house. “Crosby” was adopted and marched off to traditional obedience classes immediately. During the year that ensued, Sarah attended a number of more reward-based clicker training and agility seminars as well and was hooked. Crosby and Sarah began competing in agility the following year, and Sarah began teaching agility classes the next year. Fascinated with the “new” application of learning theory to real-life dog training and behavior modification, Sarah left IBM in 1998 to pursue additional education in animal behavior. She completed three years of graduate work in psychology/neuroscience with Dr. Craig Kinsley at the University of Richmond. She graduated valedictorian and with honors from Jean Donaldson’s Academy for Dog Trainers at the San Francisco SPCA in 2001, and joined the Richmond SPCA shortly thereafter as their director of education and training.

3:15 pm -

CLOSING KEYNOTE: +R Training: The Force Free Movement

Pat Miller As a cross-over trainer, Pat is proud to be recognized as one of the pioneers in the industry's quantum shift from almost universally coercion-based training to the widespread acceptance today of force-free training methods. Along with that shift has come a monumental surge of trainers who are intrigued and compelled by the science of behavior and learning. We now very much care about the "why," not just the "how." Such was not always the case. Join Pat in a review of this journey; a discussion of the current state of the industry; a hopeful glimpse into the future - and how we might continue to influence the direction of our profession.
Pat Miller has been training dogs for more than 35 years. As a child, Pat was the one who taught the family dog to sit, lie down, and jump over broomsticks in the living room. Her professional life has always involved animals, first as a horse trainer in Wisconsin, then for 20 years as a humane officer at the Marin Humane society in California, and most recently as a certified professional dog trainer and behavior consultant. She launched her own dog training company on the West Coast in 1996, after five years assisting nationally acclaimed obedience instructor Judie Howard of Arydith Obedience, and relocated the Peaceable Paws Dog and Puppy Training Center to Chattanooga, Tenn., in the year 2000, then to its present 80-acre campus in Fairplay, Md., in April of 2004. Pat received her CPDT-KA certification as a professional dog trainer from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers in September of 2001, one of the first 136 trainers in the world to attain this title. Pat is also a freelance writer and author, regularly contributing articles on dog behavior and training to The Whole Dog Journal, Your Dog (a publication of Tufts University's Veterinary School), and several other publications. She is also Training Editor for The Whole Dog Journal. Her first dog training book, The Power of Positive Dog Training was released by Howell Book House in August of 2001 and has been on Amazon.com’s "Top 10 Dog Training Books" list since January of 2002. Her other books are: Positive Perspectives, Positive Perspectives 2, and Play With Your Dog. A "cross-over" trainer, Pat started her long dog-training career using "old-fashioned" methods that relied on the use of force-based tools and methods – jerks on the choke chain, harsh verbal corrections – and successfully earned numerous obedience titles with a variety of dogs, including a Rough Collie, a Bull Terrier, an Australian Kelpie, a Pomeranian, and Josie, her wonderful Terrier mix. It was Josie who convinced her to cross over to force-free methods, and she is now fully committed to science-based, positive reinforcement training. Pat shares her Fairplay home with husband Paul, and their five dogs (Missy, Dubhy, Lucy, Scooter and Bonnie); three cats (Barney, Viva and Blue); five horses (Molly, Rafiki, Levi, Mikey and Olivia); one donkey (Joan); and one pot-bellied pig (Sturgis). They also operate Peaceable Pastures, a horse-friendly boarding facility.

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